running electrical to a workshop

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  #1  
Old 11-25-05, 02:50 AM
rokytop1
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running electrical to a workshop

I have recently built a workshop and now I want to run electric to it. I live in a mobile home w/ a 200a service breaker box under the meter leading to a 200a breaker box in the home. Now there is a space for another breaker in the box under the meter. Can I put a 60a breaker there, run #6 wire from it to a 100a breaker box ground it and run plugs and lights from there? I wont be running any 220v equipment, at most 15a saws and such. The run will be appx 100ft. There is only one space in my breaker box in my home for a single pole so I cannot go there. Thank You
 
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Old 11-26-05, 06:00 AM
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Yes you can add a breaker to this panel. I've done the same for modular homes and such. But why a 60 amp breaker for the type of usage you are going to use? And you say you will only be using 120 VAC, why can't you use the single opening left in your home?
For the use you are referring too. I normally run a 30 amp 220VAC circut to a small sub panel with 4 openings for breaker.
 
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Old 11-27-05, 02:09 AM
rokytop1
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Thanks for the feedback. I was thinking of possible future use w/ the 60a breaker, hate to limit myself . Exactly how would you go about running this project? I have alot of experiance w/ the wiring of switches, and plugs but have never tackled this kind of project. I picked up the breaker and box for free thru a friend which factored in my decision of equipment type use. Thanks again for the input
 
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Old 11-27-05, 07:37 AM
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You already have one electrical plastic conduit exiting the meter/panel box (called a pedestal) to ground, that has the mobile home wiring in it, don't you? Here I am around these things al the time and I can't recall if this is going to be a problem for you or not, regarding extra knockouts. I doubt it though. Hopefully you have more knockouts under the breaker box that is under your meter's breaker box. If so, you have to attach a plastic fitting up into the box and then come off the bottom of that with more electrical type plastic conduit (that gray stuff, whatever they call it). Elbow it under ground so that the piping runs about 18 inches? under ground out to the shop and then bring it up the outside of the shop to a height of ? and get it into the shop where then you hook up the other end to the new panel box out there.

I am in the mobile home business and I know how these meter and electrical boxes (pedestals) are and the conduit. (We too have new 200 capability with the pedestal boxes and conduit underground) You will need to run a minimum gauge size of #6-3 w/gnd for possible 220 capable at 50 amps, if you want to go that route. For 60 amp, I would guess it's #4 wire to use. I beleive wire starts getting exponentially more xpensive per gauge size increases, so you may want to consider your realistic needs. At home centers or on the web you should be able to find the formula for gauge size needs for amp size per given distances of wire run.

If you googled "mobile home pedestal box" maybe something would come up? Pictures? Descriptions?

Others here can probably help you more on exacting specs. The ground rod, etc. At least this is a start.
 
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Old 11-27-05, 07:56 AM
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Is the space in the pedestal panel enough for a two-pole breaker?
If so then you can run from this to the garage. You will need to run three #6cu and a ground which can be #10cu. The ground must be green or bare. DO NOT run 6/3NM cable in the conduit.

You can install a 60 amp breaker to feed the garage since the lowest ampacity of #6cu is 55 amps and we upsize to the next common breaker, 60.

You MUST have a ground rod at the garage since it is being fed by a feeder. You need to run a #6cu from the ground bar to the ground rod. The grounds and neutral must remain isolated. You do not install any bond screws or straps, and if one exists it must be removed.


These are only a few points to consider. PLEASE read up a bit on the subject, or to a web search for something like "Feeding a detached garage" or "garage service" or "garage electric feeder"
 
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Old 11-28-05, 07:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Speedy Petey
You MUST have a ground rod at the garage since it is being fed by a feeder. You need to run a #6cu from the ground bar to the ground rod. The grounds and neutral must remain isolated. You do not install any bond screws or straps, and if one exists it must be removed.
Just for clarification..

Even though the ground and neutrals are connected in the supplying box (and grounded using rod(s)), they need to be seperated at the destination box and a 2cd grounding rod installed at that location?

What's the reasoning behind this? (Just asking).

I ran power to my shop (using a 50a), but didn't seperate the ground and neutral at the destination. Been like that for years, but if it's not correct I'd like to change it and hammering a new 6' ground rod isn't that difficult.
 
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Old 11-28-05, 07:28 PM
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If you bond the neutral and grounding more than one place, you get current flowing on the grounding wire. You don't want that. Among other things, it creates different ground potentials.

Grounding rods need to have at least 8 feet of contact with the earth.

Grounding and bonding are more complicated subjects than most people could possibly imagine.
 
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Old 11-28-05, 07:53 PM
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That's good to know.. I'll fix that.
 
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Old 11-28-05, 09:28 PM
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This is ONLY if you ran a 4-wire feeder to your garage. If you only ran a 3-wire feeder you DO bond the neutral and grounds in the sub.
How many wires are run to feed the garage panel?

This is a good example of why we should not mix threads. One person's job might be only slightly different yet need very different answers.
My earlier suggestions were directed specifically at the original poster.
 
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Old 11-29-05, 01:24 AM
rokytop1
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Thanks for the replys. This is a great forum.
 
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Old 11-29-05, 07:01 AM
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Based on the posts existing, it sounded like 3 wires with ground (at least that is what was being proposed).

I too ran 3 with ground (two hots, a neutral and a ground).

Do they have residential 4 wire service? What's it used for?
 
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Old 11-29-05, 01:57 PM
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As far as feeders go, two hots, neutral and ground is typically considered a 4-wire feeder.
 
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