Moving a switch & ceiling light...

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  #1  
Old 11-27-05, 06:39 PM
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Moving a switch & ceiling light...

Hello!

Here's the situation:

There is 12/2 with ground that is fed from the panel to a junction box. From the junction box the ceiling light and switch has the original wiring (12/2 without ground). The ground wire from the feed line is not connected to anything.

I have replaced the switch, which has a ground screw.

The ceiling light is in an old bomb shelter (serious), which is part of the basement. The wire has been run through the ceiling, which is 8 to 10 inches of concrete. The wire is in thin wall conduit.

I cannot remove the old porcelain fixture as the screws are rusted and the slots are ruined. I fear breaking away the fixture (after shutting off the power) as I'm not sure of the condition of the fixture box. And I don't want to ruin the existing wiring.

Two questions:

1) What's the harm in hooking the original wiring (12/2 without ground) to the new feed (12/2 with ground).

2) If I were able to remove the light and change the wires to 12/2 with ground, I haven't found one of those single (exposed) bulb porcelain fixtures with a place for the ground wire. So, once I reach the fixture, what to I do with that ground wire? If there's no spot for it, why not just use 12/2 without ground from the switch?

Thanks...
 
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  #2  
Old 11-27-05, 10:36 PM
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(1) No harm. Connect the grounding wire to the metal box.

(2) If the fixture has no place to connect the ground, don't connect it to the fixture. But do connect it to the metal box. I doubt you can conveniently find a place that sells 12/2 without ground. But why is there a cable at all? Since you have conduit, why aren't you running individual THHN wires?

Why is there a "new feed" anyway? Other than replacing the light fixture and switch, what is the rest of the project?
 
  #3  
Old 11-28-05, 07:01 AM
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Thanks for your comments, John.

As I mentioned, this light is in an old "bomb shelter". The new feed was run to a junction box - probably around 10 years ago. The original light and switch was connected in the junction box. The rest of the project? It looks like there were several receptacles located around this "bomb shelter". That, along with comments from folks in the neigborhood, would suggest that plants were being grown -- and I doubt that they were green peppers!

So, I've removed everything except the light and switch. I do have a partial roll of Romex 12/2 wire without ground.

I should add that when I say "run in conduit"... the conduit was used to fish the old style 12/2 wire from the edge of the wall to the light fixture. Where it enters the wall the conduit is just an exposed end. From that point, back to the junction box the cable is exposed.

Doesn't the metal conduit system (if installed properly) provide the means for ground? And with what I've mentioned above, there would be no ground if I were able to fish 12/2 with ground Romex to the fixture, correct? Maybe I have the wrong impression of how that works.

I may place the switch in a double wall box and place a duplex receptacle next to it. Not sure about that yet.

Thanks again for the comments...
 
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Old 11-28-05, 07:36 AM
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Doesn't the metal conduit system (if installed properly) provide the means for ground?
Yes. Of course, the "if installed properly" part is pretty important. Most people, especially DIYers, are better served to run a grounding wire instead of relying on the conduit.

I do have a partial roll of Romex 12/2 wire without ground.
Throw it away, especially if it is old. In fact, you should probably take this opportunity to remove all the old wiring if you can reasonably do so.
 
  #5  
Old 11-28-05, 08:08 AM
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Porcelain light fixtures, and the newer plastic versions, do not have a ground connection because they donít need one. They are not metal and there is nothing to ground. Years ago they didnít run grounds on most circuits (as you know). If you use these now, you connect the ground wires together and to the metal box, or just tuck them away in the back of the box.

In your case I recommend that you replace the wire in the conduit and also that you remove and replace the metal box that is corroded.
 
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Old 11-28-05, 08:27 AM
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I'm curious! You must monitor this website around the clock (almost). By the number of responses, it sure seems as though you spend a great deal of time on this. I can say that I certainly appreciate the fast responses. I'm in the process of e-mailing a couple of friends that will love this site. I just joined yesterday and I'm amazed as what's being offered.

I'vd spent too much time (I should be working!) viewing some other topics along with this. Pretty neat stuff... and thanks again.
 
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