Not enough outside receptacles

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Old 12-04-05, 02:04 PM
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Not enough outside receptacles

I'm just reading through "Wiring Simplified," as has been suggested in this forum many times. Great book, by the way.

Anyway, I read that the NEC requires at least one outside receptacle in the front of the house, and one in back. I have one in the back of my house (built in 1984), but I don't have one in the front. I have receptacles in the garage, so I've always used extension cords for running power trimmers and blowers, and that sort of thing. I don't do any holiday lighting in the front of the house, so having no outlet isn't a big deal to me. Will this type of violation be a problem when I try to sell the house? The front of the house is brick, so it wouldn't be the easiest install.

Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 12-04-05, 02:18 PM
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Codes are not applied retroactively. So the only code that matters is the code that was in effect when the house was built. You are never required to bring a house up to modern code.

There is one exception. It's not an official exception, but one that is enforced by most home inspectors. Most home inspectors will advise buyers whenever there is not GFCI protection as required by modern code. And most sellers will comply with the buyers request to provide GFCI. So if you own an older house, you might as well make sure your kitchen, bathroom, garage, unfinished basement, and outside receptacles are GFCI protected. You'll probably have to do it when you sell anyway, so you might as well enjoy the safety benefits yourself until then.
 
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Old 12-04-05, 04:23 PM
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Thanks, John, that really clears things up about the codes not applying retroactively.

Also a great point about GFCI. In fact, I'm going to add GFCI to my kitchen when I get around to taking down the wallpaper and painting it this winter. The bathrooms, garage, and outside outlet are already GFCI protected.
 
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