Installing cabinet that covers over receptacle

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  #1  
Old 12-06-05, 01:02 PM
Cyberben3D
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Installing cabinet that covers over receptacle

A tall custom cabinet is being delivered in a couple days - the kind that need to be screwed into the wall so they don't tip over - and there is a receptacle right where it's going to be installed.

I'd like to move it but there is no slack in the cable. I can't just remove it because it's not an end of run. But I can't just turn it into a junction box because it's going to be covered over by the new cupboard.

I'm hoping there is something I'm missing... or else I have to run a new cable from the previous receptacle on the circuit to the next one... and it's a huge pain in the butt. There's wood paneling over the drywall, and the previous receptacle on the circuit is far far away... over the kitchen and into another room and hard to reach from the attic.

Is there a simple solution I might be missing?
 
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  #2  
Old 12-06-05, 01:12 PM
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Can it be turned so it's facing the room on the other side of the wall?
 
  #3  
Old 12-06-05, 01:21 PM
Cyberben3D
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That's the solution...

That's IT! I never would have thought of that - THANK YOU!!!

Kind regards,

- Ben
 
  #4  
Old 12-06-05, 03:37 PM
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It might be required to meet the 6/12 rule for receptacles along a wall. Can you cut a hole in the back of the cabinet so it can be accessed?
 
  #5  
Old 12-06-05, 04:41 PM
Cyberben3D
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A follow up code question

I don't think this cupboard will be simple enough to cut a hole where the receptacle is, but now that I'm opening up the wall a bit more I can see that the cables go straight up towards the ceiling, so I can get enough slack to move it over - and upwards - and still keep it facing the same direction.

But the question I have now is... since there's a bathroom on the opposite wall I'm going to have to pull the cable into the same stud "slot" as shower pipes. Is there a code rule about running cables in between the same studs as water pipes? Or mounting a receptacle on the opposite wall of a shower head?

I didn't find anything in my book about bathroom remodeling or my book about home wiring...
 
  #6  
Old 12-06-05, 04:52 PM
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There are a lot of codes that come into play here. The best option is probably to see if you can leave the receptacle where it is and cut a hole in the back of the cabinet. Otherwise, you may create a violation of the required receptacles in the room.

Since the room on the other side is a bathroom, you won't be able to face the receptacle into this room. You'll therefore need to remove the receptacle, turn the box around, splice the wires, and put a blank plate over it. There's no problem having it in the same cavity as the pipes.

If you can move the receptacle over in the same room, that's probably the second-best solution (after the hole in the back of the cabinet solution). But you'll want to make sure the receptacle stays under 5.5' high, and you'll want to measure the distance from the new location to the receptacle or door on either side. It must be within 6 feet of a doorway, or 12 feet of the next receptacle in both directions (if no nearby doorway).

If there is an attic above this room, you can move the receptacle anywhere you want as long as you meet the spacing requirements.

To meet the spacing requirements, you may need to replace the receptacle with two new receptacles, one on either side of the new cabinet. Of course, all splices must be in permanently accessible junction boxes.

There may be other codes involved too, depending on what room this is. This isn't such a simple thing.
 
  #7  
Old 12-06-05, 05:52 PM
Cyberben3D
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Thanks John - your info is very helpful.

The room with the receptacle is a kitchen. I had intended on using a GFCI receptacle on the opposite bathroom wall. But it seemed a bit too close to the shower so I was going to put a cover over it like you said.

But a better solution would be to keep the recp. available in the kitchen for our water cooler. Here you can see what I mean:

http://www.webtrainor.com/new_cabinet_preparation.jpg

The yellow outline is where the new cabinet will be, and there is a hole where the recp. used to be.

If I move it over and up, it will be about 6 FT away (along the wall) from the next recp. (circled in yellow).

So as long as I'm okay mounting it in the same cavity as the pipes I should be good to go! (I think).

It seemed so simple at first...
 
  #8  
Old 12-06-05, 06:05 PM
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The more we learn about this, the more complicated it gets. Now we have not only the bathroom codes to consider, but the kitchen codes. These two rooms are the two most electrically regulated rooms in the house. But I think your plan will be acceptable.

Is this space really in the kitchen proper? Or would you say it's in an dining nook within the kitchen?
 
  #9  
Old 12-06-05, 06:16 PM
Cyberben3D
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It's in the dining nook really, but you can see it's borderline kitchen. The recp. in question is not on a kitchen circuit, but the nook circuit, along with some recp's in another adjoining room.

Thanks again for your help.

- ben
 
  #10  
Old 12-06-05, 07:05 PM
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Is there going to be a counter under that receptacle? If no then it looks OK to me.
 
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