Replacing knob and tube

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  #1  
Old 12-07-05, 11:33 PM
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Join Date: May 2005
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 13
Replacing knob and tube

Okay, here's my dilema.
I have a fair bit of K&T I need to get rid of for insurance purposes (don't we all).
I've only lived in this house 6 months so as I'm getting ready to try to tackle wiring for the first time I start reading... Now that I understand a bit better, my panel seems to make no logical sense. I have a three bedroom semi detached and there is stuff doubled on breakers and there seems to be no real "plan" to the layout.

I'm seriously considering redoing the majority of it.

Now keep in mind, there is mostly new grounded wire up to at least the first floor, but it doesn't go from the switches to the fixtures etc... Kind of a hack job...

Should I try to sort out the nonsense and replan my panel with the existing stuff, or just say screw it and start from scratch... (all the big stuff like the dryer, stove, kitchen etc.. is good and I wouldn't have to touch it.)
 
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  #2  
Old 12-08-05, 06:11 AM
jingram_CA
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Originally Posted by Stearman
Should I try to sort out the nonsense and replan my panel with the existing stuff, or just say screw it and start from scratch... (all the big stuff like the dryer, stove, kitchen etc.. is good and I wouldn't have to touch it.)
Is your panel large enough to redo the house correctly? The service might need to be upgraded.

TO rewire an existing house takes alot of work, its getting the wires to the plugs, switches and light fixtures that takes time. You might have to pull out sections of walls. This might be a start of a major reno. This is where I started my reno on my house, had to do some rewiring, it hasn't stop since.

I would figure out first where every circuit goes, do an existing wiring diagram to help better understand where the wires go. Then do a new wiring diagram of how you want to rewire the house. Try to figure out how you are going to get the wires to where you need them. Get a couple of quotes from electricians, they might be able to use their experience to make the job easier.

Good luck

Jon
 
  #3  
Old 12-08-05, 07:16 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Milwaukee WI
Posts: 1,338
If you're set on doing this yourself:

1. Get copies of all applicable codes, as well as a good electrical textbook, and start reading.

2. Diagram all of your existing circuits.

3. Figure out what you need now based on current codes and your desires.

4. Replace service panel and service entrance cable if necessary.

5. Run good temporary power to temporary boxes everywhere you need it.

6. Get permits or accept the risks of working without a permit. Around here that means "Pay now or pay later."

7. Abandon all of the knob-and-tube and whatever else you're replacing.

8. Start replacing.

I spent about a year of nights and weekends, off and on, fishing flex conduit through walls to replace all of my old wiring and had an electrician replace the 100A service with 200A and do some offset conduit work that was too hard for me. The only spot where I tore stuff out and replaced it same-day was the bathroom. The house was a little darker that year, but now it's safer and more convenient all around.
 
  #4  
Old 12-09-05, 08:19 PM
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Location: Toronto Canada
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Thanks guys,
The existing panel and service can easily handle the house...

I may look into taking a week off to try this. The house is a beauty set up for pulling cable, so that won't be SUCH a nightmare...
 
  #5  
Old 12-12-05, 07:21 AM
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 20
It can be done

There is some excellent advice here. We just finshed our house. It was loaded with K&T. My husband made a map of the whole house and notes on each receptacle and switch, box etc. Then he made a map of what we wanted. He took a week off and we knocked holes in walls and fished wire. It was a challenge but definitely worth it. We purchased an 18" drill bit and that was a major help. Many of the first floor receptacles had been replaced but some hadn't been grounded. In one room we ran wire around the perimiter and used metal plates to keep any screws from entering the wire. There are many little tricks I learned as we went along but the most important thing I learned was to make a good plan before even starting. I should add that my husband is an electrician and I have a diploma and experience in electronics so we both know about wiring. But with all the advice here, I think any reasonable handy person can tackle it. Good luck.
 
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