Code requirements for cable run thru “Thin” walls?

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Old 12-11-05, 08:38 AM
Brick.b
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Code requirements for cable run thru “Thin” walls?

Remodeling small bathroom of an old house where the back wall of a bedroom closet is also the back wall of a bathroom closet. Walls are attached to 2x4’s turned 90 deg from normal; gap between walls is 1.5”. I hoped to remove the closet door from the bathroom closet and install a base cabinet, a mirror and a light on the back wall.

Does anyone know if code allows wiring to pass thru this wall? Is BX preferred over NM in this application?

Thanks for any help.
 
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Old 12-11-05, 01:20 PM
A
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Originally Posted by Brick.b

Does anyone know if code allows wiring to pass thru this wall? Is BX preferred over NM in this application?
1. NEC Sec 300-4 addresses the first question. If your wiring will run vertically and does not need to cross the framing members, secure your wires at least 1.25" away from the framing members so they are unlikely to get nailed. You can buy standoffs that meet the requirements of 300-4(d).

If you have to cross a framing member thru a notch or if you have to cross a pipe, you have to put a 1/16" or better metal nailing plate over the cable so that nails and drywall screws are less likely to hit the cable. (Sec. 300-4(a)(1) and (2)). You can buy these plates ready-made at the big box or electrical supply house. They have larger ones made for plumbing that also work well for notching applications.

If you are fishing wires through the unopened wall, Sec. 336-18 Exception #1 and Sec. 300-4(d) apply. That is, you just fish the wires from point a to point b, secure them as well as possible to device or junction boxes and framing on either end, and let it hang. You don't have to take the wall apart or make extraordinary efforts to secure the cable.

One other consideration is box capacity. Since your wall is shallow you will probably want to use very shallow boxes, so make sure the cubic inch capacity of the boxes and covers meets code requirements for the devices, wires and clamps that will be in the box.

2. There is no preference. If you choose BX, remember to use anti-short bushings and properly secure the bonding wire to the armor before clamping.

As always, state and local codes may be more restrictive, so you are advised to check.
 
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Old 12-12-05, 08:09 AM
Brick.b
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ArgMeMatey,
Thank you for your time and your excellent information! This helps greatly!
 
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