Wiring in an electric cooker... Help Please!!

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  #1  
Old 12-17-05, 06:23 AM
milly
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Wiring in an electric cooker... Help Please!!

Don't laugh but I need advice as to whether I can safely use a non copper, non original screw to wire my cooker in with at my new house. The previous residents so very kindly didn't bother to leave all 3 screws and I'm stuck in a village, car-less, with two hungry kids!! I have a ton of screws but naturally they are all standard, silver-coloured!

Can someone put us out of our misery please before I make a major mistake and put us out of it permanently!!

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 12-17-05, 07:05 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: port chester n y
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We will presume that this cooking appliance is either cord-connected to a receptacle,is equipped with a "lead" so that the lead-wires connect to a wires of a "supply"cable, or the wires of supply cable connect internally to the appliance.

Please submit a more detailed description of this specfic cooking-appliance.

Thanks!!!!
 
  #3  
Old 12-17-05, 11:00 AM
milly
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Cooker wiring!

Sorry Pattbaa! I'm being a dumb blonde Londoner! The cooker has a lead which comes from the back of the appliance and needs to be wired into a socket on the wall. It connects in the same way as a plugs wires connect (at least like they do in the UK!!).... you match the 3 wires from the cooker lead to the 3 within the socket and put in a screw to each to keep them in place. In the case of these screws, they actually make contact with the wires and are copper coloured, hence my concern about their need to be copper in order to conduct properly. Hope this makes sense!
Milly
 
  #4  
Old 12-17-05, 11:59 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: port chester n y
Posts: 2,117
If you are located in the UK, I'll guess to of the wires in the lead-cord connects to a 220 volt? circuit, and the 3rd is a Grounding Conductor.

A terminal screw is not relied upon to conduct pre se.The force of the screw will compress the conductor against the surface of a conducting body which is designed to conduct the current to other connection-points.

If the ONLY concern is the material of the screw--- thread-guage, lenth, all OK---then use it.

My only concern is the correction identification of the wires, especially the Ground, and the correct connections.Hope all is in good order on this point.

In the US, the "standard" 120 volt connection is Black ( "live" circuit-conductor-- 120 volts-to-Ground ) White ( Grounded circuit-conductor, 0 volts-to-Ground) Green ( Grounding conductor)
 
  #5  
Old 12-17-05, 12:43 PM
milly
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Thank you Pattbaa!

Thank you ever so much... I'm sure I can find a screw that fits amongst the hundreds I have here, and now I'm assured about conductivity, we can at last have a roast dinner! Have a happy Christmas, with kind regards across the miles,
Miranda
 
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