doorbell wiring to multiple chimes

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Old 01-04-06, 11:28 AM
wgc
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doorbell wiring to multiple chimes

Can someone please describe how to wire 2 lighted doorbell buttons to three chimes? I haven't been able to find any description of what it should look like and chimes I've looked at do not mention how to wire more than one. An alternate question might be whether there is any such thing as a repeater. I've never seen one at a home center or in real life.

Ok, here's the actual problem ... I currently have two doors with lighted doorbells ringing on one centrally located chime. That's fine as far as it goes, but I can't hear the chimes in the basement or the addition. I don't see any better place to move the chimes to so that I could hear it in the entire house, so I need some sort of repeaters or multiple chimes. I haven't looked at the transformer, but can I just run mulriple wires from the transformer to 3 chimes? Can a standard transformer handle the load? Can a lighted doorbell button handle any increased current? I have full access to the basement ceiling and attic floor, so running wiring isn't an issue and I strongly prefer that over any wireless solution, if possible.
 
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Old 01-04-06, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by wgc
but can I just run mulriple wires from the transformer to 3 chimes? Can a standard transformer handle the load? Can a lighted doorbell button handle any increased current?
1. Unless your doorbell wires are home-runned to the transformer, no. Your best bet is to wire from the existing chime to the other two locations. You may have to replace the existing wire if it's a smaller gauge. Typically the two-tone (ding for back door and ding-dong for front) system will require three (3) conductors wired in parallel to all three chimes.

2. I have an Edwards 16 VAC 30VA transformer. This powers two lighted buttons and three chimes (Angelo Bros. two-tone cheapos), over 18 AWG home-run wire. Works fine all around. This was the largest transformer that was reasonable. A 50 VA at Graybar was a lot more expensive. I believe there are instructions on the back of the Angelo packages for how to wire multiple chimes.

3. I wired this up about five years ago and have not had any problems, though I have not used an ammeter to check the current.
 
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Old 01-04-06, 11:47 AM
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You will put the new chimes in parallel with the existing chime. That is, the wires that connect to the existing chime (probably on three terminals) need to get routed to the three terminals on the next chime, and then on the final chime.

The transformer will probably have to be replaced. It may only be suitable for one chime, but could possible work for two. It probably will not be able to power three chimes.
 
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Old 01-04-06, 03:21 PM
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Follow Bob's advise on the wiring, and ArgmeMatey's advise on the transformer size and you should be fine.
The draw for the chimes does not go directly through the light bulbs in the buttons, but shunts through copper or bryillium contacts when you depress the button.
 
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Old 01-04-06, 07:54 PM
wgc
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wiring

Yes, everything seems to be a home run to the transformer and the transformer is labeled 3 VA. The wiring to the doorbell looks modern but that to the chime is ancient fabric covered stuff. I can't tell the guages of wiring so I'll probably go with replacing the ancient stuff and assuming the more modern stuff is ok (also because the ancient wire to the chime looks easier to replace than the newer wiring to the doorbell). This could be really easy to add a chime in the basement where the transformer is, but maybe I'll wait a few months to add one in the addition until the attic gets warmer for running wire. I'll have to replace the transformer with that in mind.
 
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