Can I move outlet to top of wall for mounted television?

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  #1  
Old 01-05-06, 02:01 PM
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Can I move outlet to top of wall for mounted television?

Can I move an outlet from the base board to the wall up near the ceiling?

I wouldn't change any of the wiring (I think), just move it closer to the TV so I don't have cords hanging down.
 
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Old 01-05-06, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Stumped1
Can I move an outlet from the base board to the wall up near the ceiling?

I wouldn't change any of the wiring (I think), just move it closer to the TV so I don't have cords hanging down.
Why not just add an outlet up there? Connect it to the existing outlet.

I thought about doing this too but it was easier to just cut a couple of holes in the wall and run an extension cord up inside the wall. My CATV cable goes the same way. I used a couple of those Carlon low-voltage rings to frame the holes and strung the wires through a simplex outlet cover plate to finish. I don't know if code would apply to this, but if it did I am sure it would not pass muster. I could send a couple of incriminating photos if you want.
 
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Old 01-05-06, 02:58 PM
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I'm no electrician, but I think that's a code violation and a fire hazard.

I don't think you can extend a circuit like that. I think you need a junction box or something like that. I just want to know if it's ok w/code to move the box up and over a bit. I need to go up and over about 6 feet to the corner, I thought the slack from moving it up would be enough to get to the corner.
 
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Old 01-05-06, 03:04 PM
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Adding a receptacle is perfectly fine. Moving an existing receptacle will almost certainly create a code violation (because code requires you to have a receptacle at the existing location).

To add the receptacle, just run a new cable inside the wall, up from an existing receptacle to a new "old-work" box up high. It's done all the time. Yes, you do need an approved electrical box for all devices and connections, but the existing receptacle box will serve that purpose at one end of the cable, and the new old-work box will serve that purpose at the other end. As you indicated, you cannot use devices designed for low-voltage cable such as coax or phone. And as you also indicated, you cannot use an extension cord for this purpose--you need to run NM-B cable inside the wall.

There probably is not slack in the wire to move the receptacle anyway. The existing cable probably comes in horizontally from the left, and leaves horizontally to the right. It's probably not coming down from above as you seem to be assuming.
 
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Old 01-05-06, 03:11 PM
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Yes, I was thinking the wire would be vertical. I remember now from the wiring books I recently picked up that outlets do run horizontal, outlet to outlet.

What is a "old-work" box?

The outlet is 2-prong, if that matters. Older home built in the 40's. Most likely not grounded.

What type of wire?
 
  #6  
Old 01-05-06, 03:21 PM
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An "old-work" box is what you get if you walk into the electrical aisle at Home Depot and ask the associate to show you an "old-work" box. It's an electrical outlet box designed to be installed into a finished wall. After making sure there's no stud directly behind where you want the box, you trace the outline of the box on the wall and cut out a box-sized hole in the drywall with a drywall saw. Then you fish the cable through that hole and into the existing box. Then feed the other end of the cable into the old-work box, put it in the hole, and turn the screws such that the "ears" of the box grab onto the drywall from the back. This is similar to how you install molly fasteners or toggle bolts into drywall.

Theoretically, code does not allow you to extend a non-grounded circuit. But I think adding a new box within six feet of an existing box for convenience of access only would not be the greatest violation in the world. Be sure to use a receptacle without a grounding hole, which are a bit more expensive and harder to find. Your TV doesn't have a grounded plug anyway.

You can use NM-B cable, unless your city prohibits it (e.g., in the greater Chicago area). Use 14/2 if you have a 15-amp circuit, or 12/2 if you have a 20-amp circuit.
 
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Old 01-05-06, 05:04 PM
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I JUST HOOKED UP A NEW...LCD FLAT PANEL TV FOR MY UNCLE AND WAS SURPRISED IT had a 3 prong plug...had to plug it into the wall,our cable boxes here in ny only accept 2 prong tv plugs ,like john said...im not sure if all these wall hanging lcd come with 3 prong plugs....but protron tvs do...
 
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Old 01-06-06, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by lovmy4x4
im not sure if all these wall hanging lcd come with 3 prong plugs....but protron tvs do...
Most flat panel TVs and computer monitors require a grounded circuit. It's not so much a safety ground, but the digital circuitry utilizes the ground for reference.
 
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