Shop Circuit Breaker Tripping

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  #1  
Old 01-06-06, 12:50 PM
AlB
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Question Shop Circuit Breaker Tripping

I have a dedicated 20 amp circuit (6 outlets-12/2 w/ground) in my shop.
All of a sudden my breaker is tripping with only one tool running at a time.
It is usually my table saw that trips the breaker and not all of the time. I can run it,turn it off,etc. and it will pick and choose the time to trip.In the course of a day, it may trip 4-5 times. The saw has a 15 amp 1 1/2 hp motor. At other times using my miter saw (13 amp) will trip the breaker.
I didn't have this problem until I purchased my new table saw. And as I stated earlier, only one tool at a time is running.
The shop is wired with inexpensive box store 15 amp plug ins. Should I use the beefier commercial ones? Has the breaker weakened by its numerous tripping?
 
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Old 01-06-06, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by AlB
Has the breaker weakened by its numerous tripping?
I think this is most likely your problem; the table saw will push a 20A breaker right to its limit. Being mechanical devices, breakers do wear out and some will trip sooner than others of the exact same brand. I'd try replacing the breaker with a new one.

If the new breaker doesn't solve the problem, you may need to add a dedicated circuit for the table saw and size the conductors and breaker using motor load rules. If you could post the information from the metal nameplate on the table saw motor, we can help you in that regard.

Other issues that could contribute to your problem are voltage drop caused by a long distance from the shop to the breaker box or an overheated breaker caused by a loose connection or environmental factors.
 
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Old 01-06-06, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks
you may need to add a dedicated circuit for the table saw and size the conductors and breaker using motor load rules.
I agree with what else he says, but would also add that if you do run a new dedicated circuit for the table saw, check to see if your saw can be wired for 240V, and go that route while you are at it.
 
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Old 01-06-06, 02:48 PM
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It is possible to rewire your table saw to 240 volts, thereby having a dedicated circuit to it. You will enjoy quicker spoolups and less bogging. Check the nameplate on the motor to see if this is possible. It will have dual voltage/aperage ratings on it. It will also show you which wires to jumper in order to make the conversion, if it is adaptable.
 
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Old 01-06-06, 03:13 PM
AlB
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I'll try replacing the breaker first. I have a spare 20 amp breaker right next to the suspect one. As for distance, my 200 amp service panel is mounted on my shop wall..about 1 foot from the outlet that the saw is plugged into.

Yes the saw can be wired 240(220?)...so I suppose I should rewire it...it came with detailed drawings on switching the wiring. Since it will only be drawing 7.5 amps on 220, can I use 12/2 wire, or should I go to #10? Also what size breaker?

Thanks,
Allen
 
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Old 01-06-06, 04:56 PM
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I would run 12-2wg to a dedicated 20A 240V receptical (NEMA 6-20R) from a 20A double pole breaker. Reidentify the white wire as a hot wire on both ends with electrical tape or magic marker.

After rewiring on the motor end, replace the table saws plug with a NEMA 6-15P.

See this chart for pictures of the various NEMA recepticals and plugs.
 
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Old 01-06-06, 06:50 PM
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I did this to all my large stationary equipment; table saw, radial arm, joiner, compressor. Makes things run alot better, since they are on dedicated circuits.
 
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Old 01-07-06, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by AlB
Since it will only be drawing 7.5 amps on 220, can I use 12/2 wire, or should I go to #10? Also what size breaker?
What is the distance from the breaker panel to the saw? For a long distance, you would want to upsize to 10/2. Otherwise stick with 12/2. In either case, use a 20A double-pole breaker.
 
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