Installing a 20 amp wall oven on a 30 amp ckt.

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Old 01-07-06, 10:21 AM
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Installing a 20 amp wall oven on a 30 amp ckt.

Hi all,
I am replacing a wall oven that required and is wired on a 30 amp circuit (the box has two 15 amp breakers supplying the circuit). The new oven requires 20 amps....what is the best way to proceed with installing the new oven? Do I need to replace the two 15 amp breakers, the entire circuit, etc...?

Thanks,
TD
 
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Old 01-07-06, 10:25 AM
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Your old oven required 15 amps, not 30. It needed 15 amps at 240 volts.

If your new oven needs 20 amps at 240 volts then you will need a 20 amp circuit. if the existing wiring can handle 20 amps (12 gage copper) then you can replace the breaker with a 20 amp breaker. If the wiring cannot handle 20 amps then you will need to run new wire.

If your new oven needs 20 amps at 120 volts (not likely) then you would need to convert the circuit over to a 120 volt circuit. You would have the same wire size issues, where you might need new wiring for the higher current flow.
 
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Old 01-07-06, 10:32 AM
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That's interesting. The technical specs call for 30 amps, and the two 15 amp breakers are tied together in the box. Can you give me some additional info?

Thanks,
TD
 
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Old 01-07-06, 10:40 AM
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15 and 15 in this case doesnt equal 30 its 15 amps on 1 wire connected to it and 15 amps on the other wire connected to it and yes they seem to be connected together but they are seperate the thing is, if one side sees fault then both open the circuit
now with this in mind do yourself a favor and call a professional
 
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Old 01-07-06, 01:08 PM
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IN a 240 volt situation, you are drawing your voltage from both buss bars on your circuit breaker panel, through the double breaker. The amperage rating on the breakers are "total" amperage. You don't add them together. So if they say 15 amps, the circuit is 15 amps. Check the size wiring to see if you can use a larger breaker, but please don't apply a larger breaker than the wire can handle. To do so would make the wiring your fuse, and the breaker would likely not trip until after the wires burned in two.
 
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Old 01-07-06, 06:00 PM
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If each of the four tires on your car is traveling at 25 MPH, is the car going 100 MPH? Of course not. The 25 MPH of each tire is the same 25 MPH, so you cannot add them.

It's the same way with a double-pole breaker on a 240-volt circuit. The 15-amps on the two breakers is the same 15 amps.
 
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Old 01-08-06, 11:31 AM
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What is the wattage rating of this appliance?
 
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