conduit in Michigan Residences

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Old 01-14-06, 06:56 AM
rwilday
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conduit in Michigan Residences

I understand that the code in Michigan only requires conduit in basements. Can anyone spell out the details. Is it only for areas where wire drops from the ceiling to a receptacle on the wall. Or, does wire need to run along the joists ,and between, via conduit?
 
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Old 01-14-06, 08:22 AM
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Have you looked online for your state and local codes? The WI and local codes that apply to me are both online now.
 

Last edited by John Nelson; 01-14-06 at 08:36 AM. Reason: eliminate unnecessary quoting
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Old 01-14-06, 08:35 AM
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It's probably not a Michigan code. It's probably a local code. Call your building department for the details.
 
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Old 01-14-06, 09:34 AM
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After reviewing the Michigan residential code, which has its electrical portion based on the 2002 National Electric Code, it seems that Nonmetallic sheathed cable (NM or Romex) is acceptable in Basements as long as it isn't considered "Run exposed and subject to physical damage" or "damp locations".
Code is found
http://infosolutions.com/iccf/gateway.dll/?f=templates$fn=default.htm$up=1$3.0$vid=ICC:mi
 
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Old 01-15-06, 04:19 PM
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Conduit in Michigan

If the basement brick wall is exposed, Conduit should run from Receptacle/Switch boxes to location above floor joist. (Just imagine as if a ceiling is going to be installed) Then either a small "J" box, a white poly cap, or a conduit end with plastic bushing would be applicated to end. NM or Romex can be run freely for the remaining run. The real exception is if the wire would be on the outside of a finished ceiling or not above. Then you must utilize conduit or metallic flex tubing and use THHN/THWN wire. Remember that you must run a ground wire to the conduit box/s!
 
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Old 01-15-06, 06:08 PM
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With few exceptions the rules are the same for flexible conduit and metal clad cable as they are for NM-B/Romex when it comes to areas subject to damage. If an area is subject to damage you need to use EMT or Sch 80 PVC

UNK
 
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Old 01-15-06, 09:28 PM
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Ok has anyone else noticed how much of a pain it is to find Schedule 80 in the local Hardware stores? I can only find it in Electric Supply Houses.
 
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Old 01-16-06, 07:36 AM
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One of the big box chains had a "contractor's supply" store locally and they are in the process of closing it. This ought to be a clue that the marketing people have no idea what is required to supply trades. I can almost never find a complete list of material at any store other than a supply house. Sch. 80 conduit would be just one annoyance among many. Of course, standing in long lines would be another issue.

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