Gfi

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-15-06, 10:29 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 107
Gfi

I was told that one GFI as the first outlet in a circuit would be the same as a GFI breaker on that circiut so the other outlets on the circuit don't have to be GFI's. I was told that the GFI would monitor all changes in current in and out of anything plugged in any outlet on that circuit even when all the outlets are not GHI's. True or false???
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-15-06, 10:59 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
True.

This assumes that the GFCI is wired properly. The input power needs to be connected to the "line" terminals, and the outgoing cable needs to be connected to the "load" terminals.

This also assumes that you just have a simple circuit, wired from a single-pole breaker with one black wire and one white wire. If you have a multiwire circuit, wired from a double-pole breaker with one black wire, one red wire, and one white wire, then this downstream protection does not work.

A simple test is to press the "test" button on the GFCI receptacle. Everything that loses power when you do this is protected by that GFCI.

Note also that a GFCI protects only against a ground fault (current that leaks out of the circuit, perhaps through you). It does not protect against a circuit overload--that's the job of the breaker.
 
  #3  
Old 01-15-06, 11:01 AM
ampz's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 536
Ist question...... True but its not as cut & dry as that.More info on the circuit is needed before simply throwing a GFCI into the 1st receptacle on each circuit.
2nd question......True
 
  #4  
Old 01-15-06, 11:16 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 107
Gfci

It is a simple two wire parellel 4 outlet circuit from a single pole breaker.
 
  #5  
Old 01-15-06, 11:24 AM
ampz's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 536
But what other loads are on the circuit,some motor loads will cause a GFCI trip if connected to the load side
 
  #6  
Old 01-15-06, 11:39 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 107
Gfci

One toaster is always plugged in and the rest are used now and then for a mixer and a blender and a chager for a cordless phone.
 
  #7  
Old 01-15-06, 11:59 AM
itsunclebill's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Denver, CO area
Posts: 221
Sounds like a kitchen circuit. If it's on a kitchen counter GFCI protection is required unless it's an old installation, and would be grandfathered unless changed. GFCI receptacles can protect downstream receptacles when wired correctly as noted above.

As a side note, the NEC (electrical code) requires that a non-GFCI receptacle that would be required to be GFCI protected in a new installation must be replaced with either a GFCI receptacle or the circuit be protected with a GFCI breaker - - IF the non-GFCI receptacle is removed for any reason.


UNK
 
  #8  
Old 01-15-06, 12:05 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 107
Gfci

If the first outlet in the circuit is the GFCI and the other three are regular outlets and the whole circuit is now protected is there any advantage if all four were GFCI outlets?
 
  #9  
Old 01-15-06, 01:45 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Originally Posted by Jeff Z
If the first outlet in the circuit is the GFCI and the other three are regular outlets and the whole circuit is now protected is there any advantage if all four were GFCI outlets?
One advantage is that you don't have to go to another receptacle to reset the receptacle if it trips. If you are talking about a single room, such as the kitchen, this is not a big advantage. If you are talking about multiple rooms, or multiple floors, such as the GFCI receptacle being in a downstairs bathroom and you trip it in the upstairs bathroom, this is an advantage.

Another advantage is that there is usually no question (or at least less of a question) what caused the trip. It's something that is (or was) plugged into the receptacle that tripped.
 
  #10  
Old 01-15-06, 03:08 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 107
Thanks

Thanks to all who took the time to reply.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'