just the begining

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  #1  
Old 01-17-06, 06:19 AM
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just the begining

I am building my dreamshop and have run into a couple of electrical questions with more to come. For my wall outlets I am putting in 20 amp circuits per code as it will be inspected. I think that I am required to have all of these GFI's. First, do they all need to be GFI? If they do I would like to put in the first plug as a GFI and that would cover the rest. The problem with this is that I have quite a few outlets on each circuit. Do I have to put a GFI every so often or will one in the circuit cover it? Is there a limit to the number of outlets on a circuit? Thanks for the help.

Also how do I attach a link to a website where I have been posting pics of my shop in case I need to attach it for someone to look at?

Darren P.
 
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Old 01-17-06, 06:29 AM
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Why do you think that 20 amp circuits are per code? It is certainly best to use 20 amp circuits rather than 15 amps ones, but code doesn't address this for work shops.

GFCI protection is probably required. One GFCI can protect the entire circuit, as long as the GFCI is properly wired. One as the first receptacle will protect the entire circuit.

In a residential setting there is no limit to the number of receptacles on a circuit. I suggest that you consider what will be used at the same time and go from there. Depending on the size of this workshop you probably want two or even three circuits serving the general purpose receptacles. You may even want to alternate, every third receptacle on the same circuit, or every other receptacle on the same circuit. You may even want to split the circuit per box, possibly with putting multiple duplex receptacles in each box.

Just type the URL into your post and it will automatically be converted into a link.
 
  #3  
Old 01-17-06, 01:39 PM
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And use conduit, multiwire-GFCIs will be easier to wire, as you can add a wire or two as needed.
 
  #4  
Old 01-17-06, 06:38 PM
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Thanks for the information. I guess I got some bad information before on the 20 amp being code. I am putting them in as I also believe it is a good idea.

I did break my general purpose outlets up into the four walls. So there is not an awful lot on any one circuit.

Everything else is on track. Tonite I hooked up the propane heater and the fan on a temporary plug to see if it would work and it was successful. I have heard that a switch is required by the heater to turn off the power to the unit for maintenance. Can this be a outlet where I can wire the heater up to a plug and just unplug it? Thanks
 
  #5  
Old 01-18-06, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by mtman
Can this be a outlet where I can wire the heater up to a plug and just unplug it? Thanks
Only if the manufacturer of the heater lists cord-and-plug as a permitted installation method. If so, then the plug counts as a means of disconnect for the equipment.
 
  #6  
Old 01-18-06, 06:27 PM
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Thanks ibpooks. After your post I did look in the manual and sure enough it wants a shut off switch. Thanks for saving me the hassle of having to change that.
 
  #7  
Old 01-19-06, 06:20 AM
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Yet another question. Is the best way to protect my 240 volt circuits a GFCI breaker at the panel? Thanks
 
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Old 01-19-06, 06:40 AM
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Your 240 volt circuits do not need to be GFCI protected. If you want it, that's fine, but it's not required. To do so you would have to use a GFCI breaker.
 
  #9  
Old 01-23-06, 05:46 PM
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Motion light questions. I am putting up two motion lights for my shop. I would like for them to come on with motion but I would also like to be able to turn a switch on and leave them on. Is this possible? If so, is it possible using 12/2NM to one or both of the lights? The reason that I ask is that I already have the wire ran to the boxes. One of the lights is close to the panel and it would be easy to change to a 12/3 if I need. Thanks
 
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Old 01-23-06, 06:10 PM
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Most all the motion detection lights have the "always on" option. It will work as a motion light under normal conditions. If you turn the switch off for about a second and immediately back on, the lights will remain on until you recycle it to the normal position by shutting down the switch for several seconds. You will actually hear the light control "click" when it resets. The only drawback to this is when you have an electrical storm and the lights flicker. This will set the lights to the "on" position. But, as in my case, my shop is 1/4 mile away, I can see the light, but seldom recycle it, as it will recycle with sun up when the photosensor turns the lights off. As far as wiring the lights, you may want to only have one sensor operate all the lights. If the sensors get out of sync, you will get really frustrated at it.
 
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