Please help Please

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  #1  
Old 01-20-06, 06:01 PM
chriswhitelaw
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Please help Please

Almost everytime we nuke something in the microwave it trips the breaker box downstairs. Why is this happening? I'm not a electrician by any means and have changed a few outlets by pure luck , is this something I'm going to have to call a professional for or is this something simple I can take of?
 
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Old 01-20-06, 06:07 PM
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First, how old is the house? If older than 1993, you probably only have one 20 amp circuit in the kitchen powering toasters, microwaves, mixers, coffee makers, blenders, etc. I had this in an old farm house I owned once. A separate circuit for the microwave is always advisable, but not always practical. If the house is newer, you should have two separate circuits across the countertops protected by GFCI. If the microwave is portable, try using another outlet, different from the one you are currently using. If it doesn't blow the breaker, then you have overloaded the original one, and need to find out what all is being powered up on this circuit and adjust it. Post back so we can help further with this.
 
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Old 01-20-06, 06:27 PM
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You are tripping the breaker because the circuit is overloaded. Either find a different circuit for the microwave, turn enough other appliances off that are on the same circuit, or run a new circuit for the microwave.
 
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Old 01-20-06, 06:30 PM
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I bet this is an over-the-range micro. Did it replace a regular range hood?
If so it is more than likely on a lighting circuit and will easily trip a 15 amp circuit with other loads on it.
 
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Old 01-20-06, 07:41 PM
chriswhitelaw
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Ok I moved the microwave to a different part of the kitchen and has not tripped the circuit at all. Now when we run the washer it trips a circuit , what is going on here? the house was built in 1946 and has since had a new circuit breaker board put in . The one that used to be in there was the circular fuse that you twist in to be up to code. I wish we knew who did the job so we could go back to them and see if they guarantee there work. We've only lived in the house for 2 years so is this supposed to be happening? when you say GFCI is that the outlet that has the test and reset buttons in the middle of the outlet?
 
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Old 01-20-06, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by chriswhitelaw
I wish we knew who did the job so we could go back to them and see if they guarantee there work.
A new service does nothing for overloaded circuits, unless they were doubled up on some fuses.
The branch circuit wirng in the house does NOT change with a service upgrade.
You simply have a 1940's home which has not had any electrical upgrades as far as circuits go. This is very typical.
 
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Old 01-21-06, 08:59 AM
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To fix the problem

To fix this problem at this point you would need to do a load evaluation on the circuits. There is a possibility that it is not 'overloaded' but have a loose wire that is causing bad connections and creating an 'overload'. Loose wiring can cause all kids of fits in a system. I dont know if I would suggest something like this to a homeowner or not, but many places will charge a flat rate to evaluate and trouble shoot a system. If you can not find someone then you should ask for help at that point.
 
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