200amp combo main to 100amp subpanel

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  #1  
Old 02-01-06, 02:06 PM
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Exclamation 200amp combo main to 100amp subpanel

hello....I'm new to forum and can't take the time to search all posts for my circumstance just now, thnx, ...inside the meter half of my new 200amp combo is a sticker that reads ground must be continous and connected to the LINE SIDE grounding lug........I live in Orl., Fl.....cannot I connect to neutral/grnd bar in the load (panel) side and still be within code? there is a strap connecting both compartments with the neutral from service drop and home sub panel neutrals and grounds.
Why did the manufacturer put this label in the meter side to begin with?
I'd much rather be able to replace the grnd wire to grnd rod, without having to gain access through utility provider, should it be required at a later date.
Lastly, my subpanel in the mobile home, contains a 100amp main breaker so do I connect a 100amp dbl pole breaker in main panel half of combo unit to feed this subpanel or can I connect the 200amp thru lugs to the house wiring?
Thanks as I've pre-scheduled my inspection for this Friday.
Rod
 
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  #2  
Old 02-01-06, 06:17 PM
bolide's Avatar
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Originally Posted by Jusmerod
inside the meter half of my new 200amp combo is a sticker that reads ground must be continous and connected to the LINE SIDE grounding lug.
Okay.

> can I connect to neutral/grnd bar in the load (panel) side and still be
> within code?

Connect what?

> there is a strap connecting both compartments with the
> neutral from service drop and home sub panel neutrals and grounds.
> Why did the manufacturer put this label in the meter side to begin with?

That's where they want the ground.

> I'd much rather be able to replace the grnd wire to grnd rod, without
> having to gain access through utility provider, should it be required at
> a later date.

Do they lock you out?
If you change it, then it has to be inspected.
Then the poco will re-seal the meter compartment.



> Lastly, my subpanel in the mobile home, contains a 100amp main breaker
> so do I connect a 100amp dbl pole breaker in main panel half of combo
> unit to feed this subpanel or can I connect the 200amp thru lugs to the
> house wiring?

Are you running 100A or 200A wire?
100A wire really needs a 100A breaker outside.
If you run 200A wire, then I don't care; but your inspector still might require another breaker.

Personally, I would use the breaker outside so that the outdoor panel can be used for other loads someday.

So my opinion: Use the 100A breaker outside.
And make sure it is screwed down.
 
  #3  
Old 02-01-06, 06:44 PM
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The panel side is not the load side. It is just downstream of the meter. Load side would be after the main breaker/disconnect.

There are different requirements in different areas. My area does NOT want a grounding connection in the meter pan. Both the GEC and water bonds must terminate in the main panel/disconnect. This is something you will have to check with your AHJ or POCO.
I assume you got a copy of your POCO's guidelines before starting? They are usually free and many are online.

I would use a 100 amp feeder to the house panel. Terminating 200 amp cable in a 100 amp panel willprove to be a challenge to say the least.
In this case do NOT sue the feed-through lugs of the 200 amp panel outside. Use a 2-pole 100 amp breaker. This breaker does not have to be secured since line side is the panel buss and not the wires on the breaker (back fed).
 
  #4  
Old 02-01-06, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Speedy Petey
Terminating 200 amp cable in a 100 amp panel will prove to be a challenge to say the least.
If he uses aluminum. He didn't specify.

This breaker does not have to be secured
But two #2 RHW (or XLP) wires can put a lot of torque on it depending on routing in the panel. So screwing it down avoids any surprise if he does has tension on the wires.

This panel will experience thousands of expansions and contractions in the coming years. My opinion is that another $2 for a holddown screw is a worthwhile investment.
 
  #5  
Old 02-01-06, 08:05 PM
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That is if there is a place to run the screw into.
 
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