recessed in shower

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  #1  
Old 02-02-06, 05:26 AM
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recessed in shower

I am gonna put a recessed light in my shower. I wanted to know is there anything special I have to do because it will be in the ceiling in the shower? Also is it a special type of recessed light that has to be used, I assume there is one made specifically for a shower. Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 02-02-06, 05:49 AM
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The recessed fixture comes in two parts, the fixture itself, which is just a can that goes into the ceiling, and the 'trim' which fits on the face of the fixture.

The 'big box' stores standard fixtures will accept shower trims, and the stores also carry such trims. If you look at the labeling on the fixtures, they will say something like 'suitable for wet locations when using trim xx, yy, zz.', go to the selection of trims and pick the one of those that you like.

Be aware that the shower trims are totally enclosed, and reduce the wattage permitted in the fixture.

If the fixture is actually installed in the shower space, I belive that it should be GFCI protected.

-Jon
 
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Old 02-02-06, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by winnie
If the fixture is actually installed in the shower space, I belive that it should be GFCI protected.

-Jon
Just my two cents but..........

When we had a light like this installed in a shower and had a ventilation fan installed, the electrician said it had to be GFCI protected. He put in a GFCI breaker for the circuit.
 

Last edited by XS6DFG0; 02-02-06 at 06:38 AM.
  #4  
Old 02-02-06, 06:34 AM
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The NEC does not require a recessed light in the shower to be GFCI protected. It must be GFCI protected only if required by the manufacturer. Look at the installation literature.
BTW, as winnie noted, because they are enclosed fixtures, the wattage of light bulb used is limited. Many of the shower lights are limited to a 60 watt 'A' bulb. When you add the trim, that may not be a lot of light. Some light/trim combinations will allow up to a 75 watt bulb. And then there are fluorescent ....
 
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Old 02-02-06, 10:31 AM
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Thanks for the response, as far as GFI, do they actually make a GFI switch. It will be a pain to run one off a plug.
 
  #6  
Old 02-02-06, 10:36 AM
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Use a faceless GFCI, or use a GFCI breaker. Do not use a receptacle, as then you get into issues of what else is on the circuit, and is the circuit legal for a bathroom.
 
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