Legallity of #10 AWG jumpered off a 40 amp circuit

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Old 02-04-06, 06:32 AM
WFO
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Legallity of #10 AWG jumpered off a 40 amp circuit

First of all, I would not run a #10 AWG circuit off a 40 amp breaker until an electrician told me this.

I am running a #8 AWG off a 40 amp breaker for a welder. I had planned to run a second circuit of #10 AWG on a 30 amp breaker right next to it to run a compressor.

My friend, who is a licensed electrician, says all I need to do is run a short nipple of #10 off the end of the #8 and swears this is legal according to code.

I know there are certain exceptions to rules involving short runs (like de-rating for instance), but is he right in this case?
 
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Old 02-04-06, 06:39 AM
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its a tap

it is called a tap. and yes you can, but there are requirements and restrictions on what you can and can not do. how far is it? what is the load to be served? what is the load of the origional equipment? so much info. if you have a code book look up taps.
 
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Old 02-04-06, 06:52 AM
WFO
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It is a home shop and the #10/2 would be romex. The other is #8/2.
The plugs would be side by side and the #10 circuit is contingency for whatever I might want to do in the future (ie-compressor, etc.). I would not run anything on them simultaneously.

Would I need to nipple from the #8 box to the #10 box with EMT?
 
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Old 02-04-06, 08:00 AM
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Originally Posted by WFO
It is a home shop and the #10/2 would be romex.
Why not a steel nipple from the junction box into the disconnect with the 30A breaker?

The plugs would be side by side
Why not run #8 to the breaker?


I would not run anything on them simultaneously.
This is the part I wonder about.
A compressor usually runs automatically.



Ask your friend for the NEC article number permitting you to tap a branch circuit (not a feeder) to install a receptacle for cord-and-plug connected equipment in a garage. Then check the actual text of the article.
It isn't unreasonable if you can show that the two appliances will not be operating at the same time. But I would want to see the permission in the text.
 
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Old 02-04-06, 09:09 AM
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Not a code expert here but the rule only applies to specific loads(motors especially). I don't think it applies to a general anything use receptacle. It certainly wouldn't apply if you plugged a heater into the receptacle.
 

Last edited by joed; 02-04-06 at 11:51 AM.
  #6  
Old 02-04-06, 11:33 AM
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In "dwelling units", a 40 amp Branch-Circuit with two outlets is restricted to cooking appliances.--- Art. 210.23, (C).
 
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