grounding recepticle

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  #1  
Old 02-04-06, 06:37 PM
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grounding recepticle

recepticle in middle of run..how to ground...is it acceptable to put one ground on one screw in the box and then leave the other ground wire long...put it under the other screw and then to the screw on the recepticle ?

or is it code to have all grounds pigtailed and then under one screw in the box?
 
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Old 02-04-06, 07:01 PM
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Originally Posted by billie_boy
receptacle in middle of run..how to ground...is it acceptable to put one ground on one screw in the box and then leave the other ground wire long...put it under the other screw and then to the screw on the receptacle ?
Do you have a picture of the "other screw"?
Is it green?
What is your applicable local jurisdiction?

Regardless, the two ground wires must be fastened to each other with a wirenut.



Is it code to have all grounds pigtailed and then under one screw in the box?
I believe this is legal for all jurisdictions (but who knows?).
 
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Old 02-04-06, 07:19 PM
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Originally Posted by billie_boy

or is it code to have all grounds pigtailed and then under one screw in the box?
Maybe not code but more then likely.

All ground wires pigtailed together.
one wire to the metal box and one wire to the receptacle or switch whatever.
one wire per screw.
 
  #4  
Old 02-04-06, 07:37 PM
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i understand the one wire per screw..can one wire be continuous...say from panel..under one screw in box and then to green screw on plug...the other ground from wire going on down the line under the other screw in box

or must you have a ground wire from green screw,,a ground wire frome each set of wires...and a ground to a screw in the box..and all grounds marred together

or would either way be ok
 
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Old 02-04-06, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by billie_boy
can one wire be continuous...say from panel..under one screw in box and then to green screw on plug...the other ground from wire going on down the line under the other screw in box
The inspectors that I have talked to don't like continuous.
As stated in post # 2 it up to the inspector.

Most are requiring you to add a wire from the box and a second wire from the receptacle, then pigtailed together with any other ground wires coming in or feeding out of the box with one wirenut.
 
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Old 02-04-06, 10:04 PM
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Originally Posted by GWIZ
The inspectors that I have talked to don't like continuous.
Do you mean when pulling single conductors?

There are green wire nuts with a hole to allow one wire to pass through "continuous" to land somewhere after merging with other ground wires.
 
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Old 02-05-06, 04:53 AM
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Originally Posted by GWIZ
The inspectors that I have talked to don't like continuous.
As stated in post # 2 it up to the inspector.
Oh really? Do they provide a code refrence to support ther "likes" and dislikes?

The method of looping a ground around a screw, then on to a splice with a greenie or crimp is the most widely used method IMO, and simplest.
Why add another piece of wire to the box? Why add another wire to the ground splice?

While not generally accepted practice in the field, I did find out that using both screws in the box (if so equipped) to ground two circuits is code legal, albeit not good workmanship IMO. Thing is, a metal box with two ground screw holes is a rare thing these days.

BTW - ground screws do not have to be green. They just cannot be sheetmetal screws and must be the correct thread.
 
  #8  
Old 02-05-06, 05:06 AM
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i think i will do the pigtail thing..but just to try and clear things up..the box is a household rectangle box for a switch or recepticle...in the back of the box there are 2 grounding screws..i had the copper wire from power line coming in around 1 scew..and the copper wire from the line going out to the next recepticle under the second screw and then to the green screw on the recepticle

i do believe i will change them and wirenut them and use only one grounding screw..the majority seem to think it is better..thanks
 
  #9  
Old 02-05-06, 06:19 AM
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Arrow

ground screws do not have to be green.
A bonding screw having a big, flat head will provide a better connection than a screw with a smaller head.

Regardless, green is what is on the market. I think everyone knows what it means. It is a screw used only for bonding one wire and for no other purpose.
 

Last edited by bolide; 02-05-06 at 06:32 AM.
  #10  
Old 02-05-06, 06:25 AM
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250.126 is for devices only.

250.148 Continuity and Attachment of Equipment Grounding Conductors to Boxes
(C) Metal Boxes

A connection shall be made between the one or more equipment grounding conductors and a metal box by means of a grounding screw that shall be used for no other purpose or a listed grounding device.


250.8 Connection of Grounding and Bonding Equipment
Grounding conductors and bonding jumpers shall be connected by exothermic welding, listed pressure connectors, listed clamps, or other listed means. Connection devices or fittings that depend solely on solder shall not be used. Sheet metal screws shall not be used to connect grounding conductors or connection devices to enclosures.
 
  #11  
Old 02-05-06, 06:28 AM
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This is a long contentious issue. Many think as you do partly because of 250.126. Thing is there is nothing in the code that says a grounding screw must be green (other than for a device) or even if it must be a "grounding screw". A 10-32 machine screw is a grounding screw.
If I am not mistaken, typical commercial grounding screws are not even UL listed. I can't remember, I just dump them and toss the package.
 
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