Using existing ground wire?

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Old 02-06-06, 03:46 PM
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Using existing ground wire?

We reciently got an HDTV however none of the outlets in that room are currently grounded. I want to ground the TV outlet in the room, but I'm not sure if I can do it this way. Above the room is a central air unit which has been grounded. Can I simply connect the outlet ground to the unit's ground wire? They are on seperate circuits as well. I'm wondering if the TV is going to expirence some kind of interference everytime the central air kicks in.
 
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Old 02-06-06, 04:44 PM
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The rules vary by country. In what country do you live?

Do you know how the A/C is grounded? Is there a grounding wire the runs from the A/C back to the main panel?

I'm not sure if you'll get interference, but you're probably right to worry about it.
 
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Old 02-06-06, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
The rules vary by country. In what country do you live?
Is there a chance that Country could be made a required field in the profile?
 
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Old 02-06-06, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by ElPresidente408
I want to ground the TV outlet in the room, but I'm not sure if I can do it this way. Above the room is a central air unit which has been grounded. Can I simply connect the outlet ground to the unit's ground wire? They are on separate circuits
No, this is not a good idea.
You want all grounding to flow toward your electrical panel.

Is there a ground outside for your dish or antenna?

There should be. And it must be tied to your grounding electrode system - outside.

Anything else is risking serious damage to your equipment someday when there is a potential (voltage) difference between your antenna/dish and the "neutral" of your electrical service.
 
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Old 02-07-06, 02:39 PM
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Sorry, I'm in the US. I don't have a dish or an antenna either since this is a cable system.

I mean the only other thing I can think of is a water pipe in the garage below my room. I'd have to find out if thats even possible to use as a ground. Getting near the electrical panel would be a challenge since it is clear across the house.

Let me also say that nothing in the house is grounded with the exception of one or two outlets which used to be for the airconditioners.
 
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Old 02-07-06, 02:42 PM
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No, you cannot connect to a water pipe for a ground.

Using the AC circuit ground would be legal if the AC circuit is at least as large (in AMPS) as the television circuit.

However, I do not recommend this. I recommend running a new circuit, or at least running a dedicated ground wire for this receptacle.
 
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