Wiring dishwasher to existing outlet (Help)

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  #1  
Old 02-22-06, 06:34 AM
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Location: Ontario, Canada
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Question Wiring dishwasher to existing outlet (Help)

Hey all,

I need a little direction. We just bought a home that was build in 1993-94. For some reason the previous owners opted not to install a dishwasher in the kitchen!!! I have the perfect opening in the cupboards to install the new unit.....I am able to get water and drain line to it very easily.
My only problem is getting the wiring to it. I have an existing outlet above the counter-top, beside the sink that is rarely used. It is also above the space I want to put the dishwasher, making it seem like the best place to get the power.

Here is my question. Since it is a kitchen outlet, it is on a 15amp breaker. Can I piggyback on this outlet, and run wires off of it direct to my dishwasher??
Or..... should I remove the outlet, wire nut the dishwasher wires and the existing wires from the breaker panel together inside the box???
I would still like to have use of the outlet if possible, but if not..... I can just put a blank cover over it. Need some direction for the best/safe way to go!
Any direction you can offer would be awesome.
Thanks
Fergie
Petawawa, Ontario, Canada.
 

Last edited by ferg26; 02-22-06 at 06:53 AM.
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  #2  
Old 02-22-06, 07:11 AM
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Location: Central New York State
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Fergie,

I am not familiar with Canadian Codes, so I cannot comment on whether what you propose is code legal or not. In the US it is not be allowed to have the dishwasher on a counter top circuit, so what you propose would not be legal if the receptacle were left in place or if it served other counter top loads.

The best solution is to add a new circuit for the dishwasher. I would recommend a 20 amp circuit, assuming this meets Canadian code. A dedicated circuit guarantees that you will have enough power for the dishwasher. Using any circuit that serves other locations (if and when code legal) requires that you be aware of the other loads and provides the chance that you will overload the circuit.
 
  #3  
Old 02-22-06, 07:22 AM
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Racraft,

Thanks for the response.
Typo on the 15 amp breaker part.
The outlet I am looking at is actually on a 20amp breaker at the panel and is the only thing on the circuit. If I disconnect the outlet, remove it, bring my dishwsher wires into the box and connect them to the wires that are already there (from the outlet i just removed) could this just be used as a junction box to make this hardwire connection?? Since it will be the only thing on the circuit, and it has a 20amp breaker, I could connect the 2 together in the box and then just put a blank cover the box making it inaccessable. Do you see any problems with that kind of a connection?? I am checking the codes aswell.
Fergie
 
  #4  
Old 02-22-06, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by ferg26
put a blank cover the box making it inaccessable.
In the electrical code, "inaccessible" has a whole different meaning, so let's not use it here. It will be covered, but accessible, as required.

I do not know if you would be required to have the cord-and-plug as a disconnecting means or not.
 
  #5  
Old 02-22-06, 09:09 AM
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Location: Central New York State
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Fergie,

In the US what you are proposing would be legal. I cannot speak for Canadian rules.
 
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