200 amps enough?

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-28-06, 11:01 AM
praisinbear's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 18
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
200 amps enough?


My question is. If I have a 200 amp service. Do I have enough room/wattage for an electric stove to be installed? I have an electric water heater 4500 watts. its on a doublepole 20 amp. I have electric baseboard heat.. It's on three double pole 20 amps. 14 feet per 20 amps. the rest of what i have is just basic house hold amps and usage. oh wait. I also have an electric dryer on a 30 amp. The store said to make sure I have enough wattage room in my box. I'm not sure how I do that. But I want to go total electric. I dont know the wattage on the stove. but the amp for it requires a 50 amp and the store guy told me 6/3 wire. any advice would help. i have a friend who has 200 amp service and she has all these things. I feel like I should be ok. But im not sure. She has two levels. I have a three level home.
 

Last edited by praisinbear; 03-02-06 at 02:13 PM.
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-28-06, 11:51 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 749
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
After you do your load calcs, you’ll find that you have way more than enough amps.
 
  #3  
Old 02-28-06, 12:20 PM
Bernard_01's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 247
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Welcome praisinbear......many homes built in the 80's around here in N.H. have your exact set-up. Your 200 amp service is very adequate. Go for it.

-Bob
 
  #4  
Old 02-28-06, 12:29 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,944
Received 42 Votes on 40 Posts
Some rather large homes actually require a 400A service, although it is not typical. You are probably just fine with a 200A, the only way to be sure is to compute your demand load. You didn't mention a spa or air conditioning; these are big power users if you have either, don't forget to count them. This is a fairly involved calculation that is more completely explained here:

http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/homew...ns/demandcalc/

An electric range requires either a 40A DP breaker and 8/3 cable or a 50A DP and 6/3 cable. It sounds like you have a more powerful range which would require a 50A DP breaker and 6/3 cable to a NEMA 1450R receptacle.
 
  #5  
Old 03-13-06, 08:59 PM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 17
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
your water heater/ 20 amp

Your water heater, I think should be on a 30 amp doubled pole breaker with noumber 10 wire.
 
  #6  
Old 03-15-06, 07:32 AM
praisinbear's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 18
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ronald. that is what I thought and the manufacturer manual said #10 wire and either 25 or 30 amp. but two different guys at HD calculated and said a douple pole 20 amp otherwise the tank would catch on fire before tripping the circuit. Well I lost a neice in a fire. I take care of my grandson right now. So thats all they had to say to scare me into going with the 20 amp. Now if that is even more of a fire hazzard ... some one please let me know. I trusted the HD guys cause they both seem to know the calc. I had the book with me when I went there for the breaker and wire. They looked at it. So its not that they didnt know what I actually had wattage wise and what the manufacturer called for.
 
  #7  
Old 03-15-06, 07:49 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
99.99% of all residental water heaters in North America are on 30-amp circuits. The fact that "two different guys at HD" calculate differently doesn't carry much weight with me. Furthermore, it's generally nuts (and a code violation) to do something counter the manufacturer's installation instructions.

The 20-amp breaker is not a fire hazard, but it may trip under certain situations leaving you without hot water. It's most likely to be a problem if three people take a shower in a short period of time, or if you're doing laundry, running the dishwasher and taking a shower. If you're not having trouble with the 20-amp breaker, you can leave it. If you later have problems and need to change the breaker to 30 amps, make darn sure you have #10 wire on that circuit.
 
  #8  
Old 03-15-06, 08:27 AM
bolide's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: PA
Posts: 1,909
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by praisinbear
that is what I thought and the manufacturer manual said #10 wire
Is this what you used? What is installed now?

> and either 25 or 30 amp.

Correct. Over 16A often moves up to the next breaker size past 20A.
That's the case here.

> two different guys at HD calculated and said a douple pole 20 amp otherwise
> the tank would catch on fire before tripping the circuit.

They lied. That is utter nonsense.


> Well I lost a neice in a fire.
I am sorry about this.


> So that's all they had to say to scare me into going with the 20 amp.

They had no business doing this. Please don't let emotions overrule logic.

The manufacturer doesn't pay people just $8 to come up with these specifications.


> Now if that is even more of a fire hazard ...

Depends on whether you used #10/2-G copper or equivalent.

If it is only #12, then you have pared down the margin of safety that you would have had by following the manufacturer's directions.


> I trusted the HD guys cause they both seem to know the calc.
They are close. But wrong on two points: it won't catch fire, and you must meet the manufacturer's requirements.


> I had the book with me when I went there for the breaker and wire.
> They looked at it.

But they didn't understand the significance of what it said.


> So its not that they didnt know what I actually had wattage
> wise and what the manufacturer called for.

Barring a typographical error, you go by what the manufacturer requires.

Because your water heater is 18A and not a continuous load, I don't have a problem with using a 20A breaker.
I assure you that a 30A is equally safe.
 
  #9  
Old 03-20-06, 01:18 PM
praisinbear's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 18
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
oh ok. yes I did definately use # 10/2 wire. I installed it myself and the breaker. The manual called for 25 or 30 amp. I will get a 25 amp and replace the 20 amp. I really appreciate your help.
 
  #10  
Old 03-20-06, 01:29 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 7,117
Received 136 Votes on 122 Posts
Originally Posted by ronald .01
Your water heater, I think should be on a 30 amp doubled pole breaker with noumber 10 wire.
Depends on the wattage if the heater. If it is not popping the breaker it is fine as is.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: