Installing new GFI outlets

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-02-06, 07:31 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 5
Installing new GFI outlets

Hello all,

Here is my situation. I am redoing my main floor bathroom. I have run (2) 12/3's from the breaker box (two available 20Amp breaker are ready to receive one end of each cable). to the walls of the bathroom. One will be going to a Nutone vent/heater/light/nightlight and will be dedicated to that. The other will serve 1 or two lights and two single gang gfi protected outlets to be located in the walls. My question is this, how do I wire the lights/gfi circuit? Thanks in advance for any info you'all can provide.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-02-06, 07:55 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
By "12/3", do you mean a black/red/white/bare cable, or a black/white/bare cable? If you mean the latter, this is normally called "12/2" instead of "12/3".

There are many ways to wire a circuit. The best solution for you depends on factors that we cannot see from here. However, chances are that any of several solutions would work perfectly fine. Here's how I would probably do it.

Run the power feed to the line side of GFCI receptacle. Run a cable from the load side of the GFCI to the second receptacle. Run another cable from the line side of the GFCI receptacle to the light switch. Run another cable from the light switch to the first light, and then from the first light to the second light.

Depending on whether or not the GFCI has two sets of line-side connections, you may need to use pigtails on the line-side of the GFCI.

Be sure to use large boxes. You'll need the room.

Alternatively, you could run the cable from the second receptacle to the switch instead of from the GFCI receptacle to the switch. This would provide GFCI protection to the lights (which is neither good nor bad). It would reduce crowding in the GFCI box.
 
  #3  
Old 03-02-06, 09:00 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 5
Thanks for the quick responce John. Yes, it is 12/2 with the bare wire for ground. The GFI's I have are Cooper brand XGF20W outlets. From some reading I have done, it is becoming clear that I only need to use one of these, as long as I make the GFI the 1st interface on the circuit. Am I right about this? Also, my house was cobbled together in 1940, and after buzzing out the house last week, I found that none of the outlets in the house are gronded, but that will be a different thread. How would I use that bare wire to make a ground? Do I need to attach it to the plumbing, or is there a "ground kit" that I can buy, or do I just drive a spike into the ground and tie the bare wire into that? Thanks again for any forthcoming answers.
 
  #4  
Old 03-02-06, 09:32 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,337
Originally Posted by Is this hot? Zz
I only need to use one of these, as long as I make the GFI the 1st interface on the circuit. Am I right about this?
Yes, you need to pay special attention to the LINE and LOAD connections. Power comes into the GFCI via the LINE terminals and protects downstream receptacles via the LOAD terminals.

How would I use that bare wire to make a ground? Do I need to attach it to the plumbing, or is there a "ground kit" that I can buy, or do I just drive a spike into the ground and tie the bare wire into that?
At the panel box, you connect the bare ground wire to the same bus bar where you terminate the white neutral wires. This is only point at which neutrals and ground are interconnected.

At the receptacle(s), you connect all of the ground wires in the box together with a 6" piece of bare wire with a wirenut. The other end of the pigtail connects to the green ground screw on the receptacle.

A simple pictorial guide book to home wiring will show this very clearly. Browse through the books at your local hardware or home center and find one that you like.
 
  #5  
Old 03-02-06, 09:49 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 5
Thank you, Ben, for that info re: the breaker box. Now, assuming I wire from the breaker box as you described, going 1st to a GFI single gang outlet box as the 1st device, and from there to a 2nd standard 1 gang outlet box, how would I continue on to power a one or two socket single switched light? I apologise if this is a stupid question, but I've put so much time into this house, I'd hate to burn it down now with a bonehead assumption. Thanks.:nfunny:
 
  #6  
Old 03-02-06, 02:57 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Just to clarify, you never, ever want to run a circuit grounding wire to the plumbing or to a stake in the ground.

A regular receptacle has two brass screws and two silve screws. You can continue power on merely by connecting the incoming cable to one of each, and the outgoing cable to the other ones.

If you don't already have three books on home wiring, get them and read them before you start.
 
  #7  
Old 03-19-06, 07:51 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 5
Thanks to all for your advice. Installation went off without a hitch due to your expert help!

Now I'm off to the plumbing forum to install the bath/shower hardware.

Thanks again!

John
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'