Running New Wires, Drywall is Done

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-04-06, 08:55 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5
Running New Wires, Drywall is Done

I want to put a kitchen in my basement, but it was never wired to handle a fridge and microwave. There is a fair bit a distance between the kitchen area and the electrical panel, and all the walls are drywalled and painted. If I hire an electrician to run a separate circuit for those appliances, roughly how much drywall am I going to have to re-do when the electrician is done? Would we be talking huge areas of the walls torn out or just a few patches?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-04-06, 10:12 PM
rdn2113's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Wally World
Posts: 451
You might consider running conduit from your panel outside to the spot where you want the cable to run in the basement. Run the conduit thru the foundation above grade. At that point you will have to gain access behind the wall or ceiling (depending on where the conduit comes in).

How you run the cables once they are inside depends on how your basement is laid out, and where you need outlets. If possible, bring the cables in where you plan to put cabinets or other things that can cover any access points you made. Also, sometimes you can use the natural channels between joists and existing openings where lights are located as access to run cables.

best wishes.
 
  #3  
Old 03-22-06, 01:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5
Thanks. From the electricians I've talked to, only two solutions seem to have presented themselves.

One is run the wires outside the house.

The other is to use the wire for the oven (220) which is already there, into a new sub-panel that would then hook up to the fridge, microwave, and range. The existing wire that runs from the main panel to the new panel would have to be enough for all three. I am currently checking with the house builder to see if it's a 30-amp or 40-amp wire, but would anyone recommend this approach?
 
  #4  
Old 03-22-06, 05:06 PM
bolide's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: PA
Posts: 1,909
> One is run the wires outside the house.

I don't like that.

> The other is to use the wire for the oven which is already there,
> into a new sub-panel that would then hook up to the fridge,
> microwave, and range.
> The existing wire that runs from the main panel to the new panel
> would have to be enough for all three.

Your new panel can't go behind the stove.

> I am currently checking with the house builder to see if it's
> a 30-amp or 40-amp wire,

It's easy to tell.

> but would anyone recommend this approach?
Check your demand load.
You are cutting the margin pretty thin.
Since the loads are intermittent, you might get away with it.
 
  #5  
Old 03-22-06, 08:07 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,113
What type of ceiling is in the basement? What is the condition of the sorounding basement areas near where the kitchen will be? It may not be all that bad,We need a better visual of the big "picture".
 
  #6  
Old 03-23-06, 09:17 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,335
If you're running with the floor joists, you can probably get by with minimal drywall holes. If you're running against the joists, you will probably need to cut out a 1 foot wide path from the panel to the new location. Unless of course you have some other path with an unfinished ceiling like a nearby utility room or something. It's really hard to say without seeing it.

I would not use the existing range circuit for the subpanel feeder. A 40A panel is a waste of time in my opinion and it precludes you or a future owner from using an electric range.
 
  #7  
Old 03-23-06, 10:16 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 1,065
You dont say if the ceilings are drywalled but i'm getting the impression they are probably drywalled and textured. If the ceiling is suspended type then this wont be a big deal or at least not as big a deal. I dont consider drywall repair, when it is painted, to be much of an issue. I certainly wouldnt let it keep me from getting the proper electrical design in place for that kitchen.

Typically if your running horizontally through wall studs you remove about a 4 to 6 inch wide length of drywall so you can bore the wood studs and run your cable. Now one of the considerations with this is the wall construction... are the walls all 2x4 studs? Metal studs? 1x2's? 1x3's? All have different issues for code compliance if you run that feeder thru the wall cavities.
The branch circuit to the oven IMO was sized to serve the oven not a sub-panel for an entire kitchen. Kitchens are where lots of power hungry appliances are used. Though you might get by on a 40 amp circuit with good load management, I agree with others that you would be cutting things to the minimums.

Also if this qualifies as a Kitchen for a dwelling I believe it will also need the required two 20 amp gfci small appliance countertop circuits.

One last thought, if it wasnt mentioned, you say the oven is 240 volts if it isnt 120/240 then it wont have a neutral in the branch circuit and you will need to run new wiring anyway.
 
  #8  
Old 03-23-06, 04:45 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5
Thanks again for the replies. The joists run do not run in the same direction as the wires would have to go, and the whole ceiling is painted and textured. I have also found out that the size of the wire they installed for the 220 is 30 amps, not 40.
 
  #9  
Old 03-24-06, 09:14 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 5
How flexible are these high capacity wires, and typically, how tight or loose are they? Would it come out if one end was pulled? Would it be possible to attach a 40 or higher wire to one end of the 30-amp wire and pull the other end to replace it?
 
  #10  
Old 03-24-06, 09:49 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 5,599
The wire will be stapled and go around corners. It will not be possible to use it pull new wire.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'