Laundry room outlets

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  #1  
Old 03-07-06, 10:03 AM
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Laundry room outlets

I could use a little advice on something. I looked in a friends NEC1999 book, but it wasn't much help - probably my fault. Thank you for your help!

I am remodeling my laundry room a little to add base cabinets on both sides of the washer and gas dryer. One base cabinet will be replacing a laundry tub setup. I am also adding wall cabinets above the cabinets and washer/dryer. Right now there is only one outlet in the room, which is for the washer/dryer (gas). The drain in the wall is one of those combo jobs with supply shutoff and drain in a plastic enclosure. The outlet is a little higher and just to the side (about 1 ft) of the drain - it is also about 4 ft from the sink).

Can I move the outlet down about 1 ft so that with the washer and dryer installed it is not visible? This would make for a cleaner installation, because right now I will have the washer and dryer cords hanging from the wall. I could install a GFCI if required (which I believe it is because of the proximity to the sink).

I would then like to add an outlet to the existing spot for maybe an iron - really just to fill the hole. I would connect to another feed, not the one dedicated to the washer/dryer. This one could also be GFCI if required.

Anyone see an issue with what I am thinking? By the way, my town follows the NEC, no special code.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-07-06, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by wrbeyer
Can I move the outlet down about 1 ft so that with the washer and dryer installed it is not visible?
You could if you have a foot of slack in the cable which feeds this receptacle; there probably isn't which means you would need to run a new cable back to the source. If you moved the receptacle, you would also have to bring the old circuit up to code if it isn't. The laundry needs a dedicated 20A circuit. It's probably a lot more work that I would be willing to do for the aesthetics of a laundry room; I also find it very handy to be able to unplug the washer or dryer without reaching behind the machine.

I could install a GFCI if required
GFCI protection is not required, because the receptacle is not "general purpose." It is for the dedicated use of the washer and dryer.

I would then like to add an outlet to the existing spot for maybe an iron - really just to fill the hole. I would connect to another feed, not the one dedicated to the washer/dryer. This one could also be GFCI if required.
GFCI protection would be a good idea here as the receptacle is for general purpose use.

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Personally, I would do the second of these two valid options:

1) Run a new dedicated 20A circuit to the location behind the appliances. Replace the existing receptacle with a GFCI and use this as your general purpose receptacle; or,

2) Leave the existing receptacle alone (if it ain't broke...), and run a new 20A circuit to a GFCI receptacle at your ironing station. This will allow you to place the new receptacle where it is most conveinient for ironing rather than where the hole in the drywall happens to be.
 
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Old 03-07-06, 05:08 PM
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While code dictates a dedicated circuit for the laundry room, it doesn't say what can and cannot be plugged into it.

I would GFCI protect any general purpose receptacle in a laundry area. I would not GFCI protect the receptacle for the washer and/or dryer.
 
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Old 03-08-06, 04:45 AM
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Thank you for the replies.

ibpooks - there actually is slack in the line. The laundry room is on the first floor and the wires run down the wall to the basement. Moving the outlets down a foot is no problem. It also appears to be up to code from what I can tell.

racraft - thankyou, I will make any general purpose outlets GFCI for this room.

I have one more question. I also want to move the electric dryer outlet down about 1 ft. This is the dedicated outlet for an electric dryer (unused because I have a gas dryer). Is there anything different in the code about this. My guess is no, but I want to check.

My plan now is to move both the dedicated 20A washer/dryer outlet and dedicated electric dryer outlet down about 1 ft. Both will remain as is on their existing wiring. I will add 2 general purpose outlets in their place that are GFCI. They will be wired off an existing feed (not much is on the feed, just a couple of lights (one in the laundry room) and a couple of outlets in the adjacent dining room. The outlets will rarely be used, mostly added to fill the existing holes, but possibly to use as cell phone/pda charging outlets.

Thanks again!
 
  #5  
Old 03-08-06, 05:23 AM
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Because of the frequent cycling of the motor, a washer could be hard on a GFCI.


But because it is a large metal object and washer is involved, I recommend a GFCI for the washer and gas dryer as well.

You may place the outlets as high as you like.
I believe that you should make them at least 4' high for the washer and dryer so that they can be unplugged without having to pull them out from the wall.
 
  #6  
Old 03-08-06, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by wrbeyer
I could install a GFCI if required (which I believe it is because of the proximity to the sink).
Originally Posted by ibpooks
GFCI protection is not required, because the receptacle is not "general purpose." It is for the dedicated use of the washer and dryer.
Originally Posted by racraft
I would not GFCI protect the receptacle for the washer and/or dryer.

In 2005, laundry and utility sinks were added to section 210.8(A)(7), which reads:

“Laundry, utility, and wet bar sinks - where the receptacles are installed within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the outside edge of the sink”

There are exceptions to the GFCI protection requirements for some areas, but other areas have no exceptions. There are no exceptions to GFCI protection requirements for receptacles installed within 6 ft of laundry, utility, or wet bar sinks.
 
  #7  
Old 03-10-06, 09:14 AM
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Thank you very much for the replies.

So, I don't have an issue with installing GFCI for the three recepticles (2 new and 1 for washer/dryer). That I can do.

What about the recepticle for the electric dryer that is unused? Do I need to replace the breaker with a GFCI version? The dryer recepticle is only 5 ft away from the sink. If that's the case, I might consider removing it completely and freeing up a spot in my main panel. I don't plan on replacing the gas dryer with an electric one any time soon. I also might consider just leaving it where it is and not moving it.

Thanks again!
 
  #8  
Old 03-10-06, 10:05 AM
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240 volt receptacles for dryers do not need GFCI protection.
 
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