How to run electric wire along inside garage wall?

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-21-06, 03:09 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern, NJ
Posts: 228
How to run electric wire along inside garage wall?

I am looking to put a hottub in my 2-car garage, I live in NJ. I have my electric panel in my garage in the front left hand corner of the garage. It's a resessed Square D box with I think 200 amp service. I need to put a 50 amp breaker in for the hottub and run 0'0" wire around the garage to the opposite corner where there will be a GFIC box in which the hottub plugs into. I need to know how to run the wire to get to from my electric panel to the opposite corner of the garage? I can't put the wire behind the sheetrock in the garage because that would require cutting up the sheetrock walls which I don't want to do. Also the rear wall of my garage is cement foundation blocks (I have a bi-level home). Above the 2-car garage is my kitchen and master bedroom. Would I need to somehow run the wire through plastic conduit attached to the walls of my garage? How do I get the wire to the outside of the sheetrock since I have a recessed electrical panel? Is there certain electrical code standards that I need to follow that state how high above the ground this wire needs to be and what type of conduit this wire must run inside?

Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-21-06, 03:17 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
There are numerous rules to follow, especially for hot tubs. I strongly suggest that you seek professional help with this. A hot tub is not the place to start.

Basically, you need to use conduit for your wires. You will have to cut out a fairly large piece anyway to get to the side of the panel and then route the conduit through the sheetrock and over to the box for the hot tub. Personally, I would just cut the sheetrock and then replace it.

What size wire do you plan on using?

Do you already have the required clearances for other receptacles?
 
  #3  
Old 03-21-06, 03:41 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern, NJ
Posts: 228
I think I have to use 0 guage wire, not sure, it's a 50 amp breaker, 240 volt. Can I run the conduit on the outside of the sheetrock instead of behind the sheetrock, I don't want to cut the sheetrock that much, I already have a piece of the sheetrock cut above the panel to access all the wires, etc. Can't I just pull the wire through a hole in the sheetrock above the panel, then put the wire inside the conduit and fasten the conduit to the outside of the sheetrock in my garage? So if you were standing inside my garage, you would see the conduit running along the garage walls from one corner of the garage to the other where the spa is, is this legal?

Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 03-21-06, 04:01 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Conduit along the wall is legal, but won't look good in my opinion. You will have to use angles to get the conduit to the panel itself.

You are incorrect on the wire.

Please consider an electrician.
 
  #5  
Old 03-21-06, 04:26 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern, NJ
Posts: 228
what do you mean use angles?
 
  #6  
Old 03-21-06, 06:23 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,113
NewJersey Code I don't know. You cannot run PVC (plastic pipe) in an inhabited area, Wich installing a hot tub now reclassifies the garage. You could start at the panel with romex of the appropriate size,6/3- 2 hots-1 neutral-1 ground. Start out of the panel with the RX then change to conduit, using a change over connector(RX to EMT). You cannot run the RX jacket in the EMT, so the first area out of the panel would have a jacket then 1-2 inches inside the pipe would have to have the outer jacket and the gRD paper removed, and fed thru the conduit to the hot tub GFCI box. Thats just for starters. You may as suggested, consult the local Pro. Water and electricity is nothing to mess with. Especialy as A first project.
 
  #7  
Old 03-21-06, 07:45 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,617
There have been numerous discussions on other electrical forums regarding the use of cables with the outer jacket stripped off, as was suggessted by lectriclee.The overwhelming opinion was that once you remove the outer cover the conductors inside are not labelled and cannot be used in a raceway like conduit.

Raceways need to be installed as a complete system from end to end. You just cannot run the conductors thru free air when you can't figure out how to run a conduit system.
 
  #8  
Old 03-21-06, 07:57 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
You need conduit from panel to sub panel. Or you need appropriate cable from panel to junction box then conduit, then junction box then cable to sub panel. Or some combination. If you run all conduit you will need right angle bends and perhaps pull points if you exceed 360 degrees of bends in the conduit.

My recommendation is to cut out the drywall, run conduit in the wall, or even cable in the wall, and then patch the drywall. That will be your easiest method for connecting the two panels.
 
  #9  
Old 03-21-06, 08:03 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,113
Who mentioned free air? I stated I did not know local code(NJ). In my area they require the jacket removed from just inside the conduit to the termination point(if piped all the way) If useing the conduit as a sleave ( for a short area of protection) then the jacket remains, But change over fittings are used on both ends, and pipe of course is secured. And also there are exceptions......
 
  #10  
Old 03-21-06, 08:08 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,113
WHY do they make change overs?
 
  #11  
Old 03-21-06, 08:12 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern, NJ
Posts: 228
okay you guys lost me, what ever happened to just putting the wire inside a piece of plastic conduit, then secure the conduit to the wall, that's what I will be doing..
 
  #12  
Old 03-22-06, 05:24 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Originally Posted by squale
okay you guys lost me, what ever happened to just putting the wire inside a piece of plastic conduit, then secure the conduit to the wall, that's what I will be doing..
Plastic is probably not going to be considered adequate protection along a garage wall.

How do you intend to go from the edge of the panel to the start of the conduit?
 
  #13  
Old 03-22-06, 06:58 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern, NJ
Posts: 228
come UP out of the panel BEHIND the sheetrock, then cut a small hole in the sheetrock, pull the wire through, then start conduit right at that point where the wire comes through the sheetrock..
 
  #14  
Old 03-22-06, 07:09 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Originally Posted by squale
come UP out of the panel BEHIND the sheetrock, then cut a small hole in the sheetrock, pull the wire through, then start conduit right at that point where the wire comes through the sheetrock..
This will leave wire exposed. That is not allowed.
 
  #15  
Old 03-22-06, 08:40 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern, NJ
Posts: 228
Then I can stick a few inches of the conduit through the hold in the sheetrock so no wire is exposed. The wire has thick plastic shielding on it anyhow so I don't see why this is a problem to have exposed wire, but I guess that's just code..
 
  #16  
Old 03-22-06, 09:35 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
You don't want to use cable. You want to use individual conductors. While cable in conduit is legal when the conduit is for protection, you only want to do this for short runs of conduit. You will find it very difficult to pull cable through conduit for any length, especially when you have right angle bends in the conduit.

I very strongly suggest that you seek an electrician for your job.

You seem to have no desire to do this properly. You very much want this to pass inspection and to be safe.

Electricity can kill. Please don't let it kill you.
 
  #17  
Old 03-22-06, 09:49 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern, NJ
Posts: 228
yes I agree I won't be doing it myself, my electrician friend will do it with me, I just wanted to educate myself so I know a little of what I am talking about when he comes to help me.

My cable run length would be about 20' down the side of my garage wall, then about 18' along the back of the garage wall, so roughly a 40' run in total with a few 90 degree bends to get around a side entry door into my garage.
 
  #18  
Old 03-22-06, 10:06 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Cut out the drywall, run the cable inside the wall, replace the drywall.
 
  #19  
Old 03-22-06, 12:05 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern, NJ
Posts: 228
I would have to cut the drywall 18' long down the entire side of my garage wall, then the back wall of the garage is just concrete block anyhow so the cable would still be exposed back there..
 
  #20  
Old 03-22-06, 12:14 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Cut out the drywall, run the cable inside the wall, replace the drywall.

At the end of the drywall make an appropriate transition to conduit for the final portion of the run.
 
  #21  
Old 03-22-06, 05:45 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,113
I disagree with the cable to conduit dispute. But I will put that away.

You could just cut a channele from the top of your panel to the ceiling. Your Electrical friend can add a connector and bend an offset out of the panel, and then to the ceiling. Continue the conduit run in the corner of the ceiling and the wall to the final destination. This will illiminate unnessasary bends. Have your electrical friend get the wire, wire the gfi, do the bonds, add required rec., make it safe. and then you can enjoy the hot tub and be safe. And we all here will agree (maybe).
And you will only have a small section of drywall to patch.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes