outlets - ground a 2 wire

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Old 03-24-06, 08:20 AM
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outlets - ground a 2 wire

I had a contractor show me once how you can wire a 3 prong outlet with 2 wires and have it test out grounded. He added a wire from one post of the outlet to another post on the outlet. Does anyone know what I am talking about and know how to do it?
 
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Old 03-24-06, 08:36 AM
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I know exactly what you are referring to..

It creates a very dangerous and unsafe situation and is illegal according to code.

Forget that you ever heard about this, do not ever try to do it, and do not use this contractor for anything in the future. He or she does not know what he or she is talking about, and is telling to do something that could kill you.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 08:41 AM
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outlet - ground a 2 wire

thanks - I will go to the expense of GCFI outlets instead
 
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Old 03-24-06, 10:53 AM
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GFCI receptacle while legal is not a grounded receptacle. If you are wanting grounding for a surge protector or PC then you will not get it from GFCI. You also only need one GFCI on the first receptacle of a circuit to protect the entire circuit on most circuits.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 11:02 AM
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outlets - ground a 2 wire

I understand that the outlet will not be grounded with the GCFI - my main objective is to quit having to use a 3 prong adapter with so much of my stuff

thanks
 
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Old 03-24-06, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by wwrice
He added a wire from one post of the outlet to another post on the outlet.
This is called a boot-leg ground, and it is not only illegal but much more dangerous than the ungrounded receptacles that it "fixes". GFCI receptacles are the cheapest and most effective method of providing shock protection on ungrounded circuits; however some appliances still should not be used without a true ground. Refrigerators, computers, some home theater / plasma TV set, and anything with a surge protector really should have a grounded circuit for longer equipment life, but will be safe to use with GFCI protection.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by wwrice
I understand that the outlet will not be grounded with the GCFI - my main objective is to quit having to use a 3 prong adapter with so much of my stuff

thanks
It depends what the ground is used for.

On much electronic equipment a real ground is needed for ground reference and EMI/RFI draining.

GFCI can only provide electrocution safety.
You shouldn't connect refrigerators and such into a GFCI, to protect the contents.

For your electronics and food storage, you need to install properly grounded circuits.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 04:08 PM
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> On much electronic equipment a real ground is needed for ground reference
> and EMI/RFI draining.

For a few devices, namely those that are tied to externally grounded devices like antennas, CATV, and satellite dishes, I'll buy that.

Surge protectors should not need a ground.
It is the job of the MBJ to keep neutral and ground at about the same same level.

On refrigerators etc, the EGC is for safety in the event of a fault.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 04:25 PM
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A surge protector unless you buy a very expensive one work by shunting the spike to ground. If the ground is not present the MOV has no place to direct the spike.
 
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Old 03-24-06, 05:06 PM
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> A surge protector unless you buy a very expensive one work by shunting the spike to ground.

Deliberately energizing the safety ground is moronic.


> If the ground is not present the MOV has no place to direct the spike.

The neutral is the only proper place to divert current from the hot wire.
Any place else is illegal.
 
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Old 03-25-06, 07:06 PM
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The fact is surge protectors do have H-E and N-E MOVs also (although, IME, it is the H-N ones that fail), and many are guaranteed and insured only if connected to a properly grounded recptacle.
 
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