converting 220v forign plug to 220v us plug

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  #1  
Old 04-01-06, 06:30 PM
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Question converting 220v forign plug to 220v us plug

hey everyone, hope someone has an answer to this.

I bought an 1500 electric burner online. the problem is that, unbenounced to me when I bought it, it is european (switzerland it looks like from what i could gather from the user's manual).
so it has the typical two round prongs. now, I have 220v in the house, but I need to be able to plug it in.

I've checked converters, too expencive.

I've checked adapters, only available us to internation not vice versa. Some that looked like it misht work, would of not been appropriate to plug into a 220v outlet.

my last hope on this thing is to just change the plug.
typically I wouldn't think it would be very hard, but I don't know what wiring configuration to expect when I strip the wire.

Do you think there would be a problem simply changing the plug?

thanks everyone.

PS
My first thought was to return it, but between the return shipping and restocking fee, I might as well just keep it!
 
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  #2  
Old 04-01-06, 06:42 PM
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you can find an adapter on this site for around 7$ before shipping
http://www.lashen.com/vendors/TRV/Default.asp
 
  #3  
Old 04-01-06, 08:24 PM
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thanks BuiLDPro68,

I think I see one that may help, but I do have another question, how do I know if it can handle 220v?
also, would I then need another adapter in order to be able to plug it in a 220v outlet?


this is the spade style I'm using:
http://graphics.x10.com/images6/hd245color.jpg

thanks again.
 
  #4  
Old 04-01-06, 09:06 PM
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Originally Posted by newhomeshopper
I bought an 1500W electric burner online. the problem is that, unbeknownst to me when I bought it, it is European (Switzerland it looks like from what i could gather from the user's manual).
Return it.


> so it has the typical two round prongs.

Yes.


> I have 220v in the house,

No, you don't. You are in the USA.


> I've checked adapters, only available us to international
> not vice versa.
> Some that looked like they might work, would have not
> been appropriate to plug into a 220v outlet.

What 220V outlet?

A 240V outlet looks pretty much like a 120V outlet except that the two prongs are straight in line rather than parallel.


> my last hope on this thing is to just change the plug.

It could work.


> typically I wouldn't think it would be very hard, but I don't
> know what wiring configuration to expect when I strip the
> wire.

Furthermore, the chance that you have a 240V outlet is 0.


> Do you think there would be a problem simply changing the plug?

Yes. Where would you plug it in?
Can it handle 250V that you have in your house?

It will become a 1700W burner.


> My first thought was to return it,

That is the best choice.

> but between the return shipping and restocking fee,
> I might as well just keep it!

It will cost you a lot more to get a NEMA 6-15 receptacle and plug installed to be able to use it.

Even at that, who can guarantee that it won't burn up?
 
  #5  
Old 04-01-06, 09:22 PM
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"> I have 220v in the house,

No, you don't. You are in the USA."

the bracker pannel has this particular outlet tagged as a 220v on a seperate bracker. It is under a window, so it looks like it was made for a ac unit or something.

now, you may be right that you can't get 220v in the US, but the info that is in the house is the one on the post! the outlet is not 110v, what is it?

the original plug that was on there was exactly like the one you described:

"A 240V outlet looks pretty much like a 120V outlet except that the two prongs are straight in line rather than parallel", but I had to put in a new one bc it was painted over.

thanks again.
 
  #6  
Old 04-01-06, 11:26 PM
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> the breaker panel has this particular outlet tagged as
> a 220v on a separate breaker.

That's a very common mistake.

Only a voltmeter will tell you what you really have.

In the USA you should expect 228 to 252V (except in California) with both legs ungrounded.

The correct nominal voltage is 240V RMS. Regular outlets are 120V nominal.

220V (Switzerland) is 207-244V with one leg grounded.


> It is under a window, so it looks like it was made for a A/C
> unit or something.

> The outlet is not 110V, what is it?

You need a voltmeter.
It's probably at least 240 and could be as high as 251.9V.


> the original plug that was on there was exactly like the one you described

Okay. That's the "correct" one.
 
  #7  
Old 04-01-06, 11:52 PM
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fyi:
I replaced it (the original receptacle with horizontal plugs) with the one described above.
 
  #8  
Old 04-02-06, 12:37 AM
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> I replaced it (the original receptacle with horizontal plugs) with
> the one described above.

With which one described above? The same kind as was previously there that you painted over?
 
  #9  
Old 04-02-06, 12:52 AM
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the one that shows on the link at the beggining of the thread.
 
  #10  
Old 04-02-06, 01:28 AM
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So get a plug like that.

Your Swiss appliance has just two wires.

Connect these to the two flat blades.

You'll have nothing to connect to the U-ground as the appliance is ungrounded (at least you better hope so).


Does the appliance have any ratings on it for volts, amps, or watts?
 
  #11  
Old 04-02-06, 09:14 AM
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230v
50hz
1500w
 
  #12  
Old 04-02-06, 10:59 AM
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That's not so bad as 220V.
You'll have a 1630W burner instead of 1500W, possibly only 2.5% above the designed limit.

Assuming that it is thermostatically controlled and double insulated, the only issue is that it might have a much shorter service life from the overvoltage. If you are in most parts of California, then no problem there either.
 
  #13  
Old 04-03-06, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by bolide
That's not so bad as 220V.
You'll have a 1630W burner instead of 1500W, possibly only 2.5% above the designed limit.

Assuming that it is thermostatically controlled and double insulated, the only issue is that it might have a much shorter service life from the overvoltage. If you are in most parts of California, then no problem there either.
The standard nominal service voltage in Europe is defined as 230 volts, plus or minus 10 volts. That means it is permitted to provide electrical service from 220 to 240 volts. Many countries that had been operating at the lower or upper end of the range are moving to the center of the range. Many are not. Anything made for the European market must operate correctly and safely on that 220 to 240 volt range. But service life can still be a real problem.

In addition to the voltage range, some parts of Europe still derive 220 volts from 2 wires of a 220Y/127 volt three phase secondary. Further, the receptacles in many parts of Europe are non-polarized. So to be safe, no pluggable appliance is allowed to expect a current carrying conductor to be grounded. A properly designed European appliance would be safe operating on North American 240 volts, unless somehow the 60 Hz frequency becomes an issue (it might for timers and motors). Locations here with 208 volts could have an undervoltage issue.
 
  #14  
Old 04-03-06, 06:36 PM
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safe in North America?

> Anything made for the European market must operate correctly
> and safely on that 220 to 240 volt range.

The original post stated 220V.


> But service life can still be a real problem.

If the 1500W was calculated at 220V, it would be 1705W at 250V.

Fortunately, the appliance is actually rated at 230V.


> So to be safe, no pluggable appliance is allowed to expect
> a current carrying conductor to be grounded.

But if it had been an old 220V appliance from surplus or liquation, who knows?


> A properly designed European appliance would be safe
> operating on North American 240 volts

How did you ascertain this? I commonly see up to 252V which is another 5% over what you said before is safe.

Not that I disagree that this particular appliance is safe... but that's because it is controlled by a thermostat.
 
  #15  
Old 04-03-06, 08:13 PM
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first of all, I want to thank you guys for the help.


I have another question:

In addition to the voltage range, some parts of Europe still derive 220 volts from 2 wires of a 220Y/127 volt three phase secondary. Further, the receptacles in many parts of Europe are non-polarized. So to be safe, no pluggable appliance is allowed to expect a current carrying conductor to be grounded. A properly designed European appliance would be safe operating on North American 240 volts, unless somehow the 60 Hz frequency becomes an issue (it might for timers and motors). Locations here with 208 volts could have an undervoltage issue
.
I'll pleade even more ignorance, what does this mean in a practical sence of me changing the plug from euro to a plug into the outlet for the one in the house.

thanks again.
 
  #16  
Old 04-03-06, 10:28 PM
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> what does this mean in a practical sense of me changing the
> plug from euro to a plug into the outlet for the one in the house.

Sorry, nothing. We're just talking about possibilities. None of it changes what you are going to do.
 
  #17  
Old 04-04-06, 02:53 AM
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Originally Posted by bolide
> Anything made for the European market must operate correctly
> and safely on that 220 to 240 volt range.

The original post stated 220V.
It's just common to say "220" when referencing what is 220 to 240 volts, or in North America even down to 208 volts. Likewise saying "110" is for 110 to 120 volts.


Originally Posted by bolide
> So to be safe, no pluggable appliance is allowed to expect
> a current carrying conductor to be grounded.

But if it had been an old 220V appliance from surplus or liquation, who knows?
Anything old can be unsafe for a variety of reasons, including wiring not done to today's standards (in North America or Europe).


Originally Posted by bolide
> A properly designed European appliance would be safe
> operating on North American 240 volts

How did you ascertain this? I commonly see up to 252V which is another 5% over what you said before is safe.
The nominal in North America is 240 volts. The nominal in Europe is 220 to 240 volts. Either can have situational variances. UK is still mostly using 240 volts and you could see 252 volts in places for the same reason. Would a Swiss appliance intended for 230 volts work there? A recent vintage with a CE mark certainly should.

Originally Posted by bolide
Not that I disagree that this particular appliance is safe... but that's because it is controlled by a thermostat.
As long as the overvoltage is not so high as to have such a temperature rise and gradient that even the thermostat can't protect it. I would advise against running it on 277 volts if that opportunity existed.
 
  #18  
Old 04-04-06, 10:30 AM
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Quite a number of years ago while visiting friends in Ireland, I became enamored with a Russell Hobbs electric teakettle. Unlike the wimpy 1500w U.S. standard, this one was 220/240v, 2.0/2.4kW and heated about 1.5L of water to boiling in about a minute. Needless to say, I bought one.

Due to the multiplicity of European plug standards, the teakettle came with a 3-wire plug for the teakettle that ended in pigtails. You were expected to buy the right plug and connect it yourself.

I had a 220v outlet installed in the kitchen "appliance garage" (new construction, so no retrofit required), added the proper 3-wire U.S. plug, and have been delighted ever since.

The only reservation I'd have about the situation described is that if the available outlet was for a window A/C unit, it might have a 30A or 40A breaker, which is a bit high for a kitchen appliance. It might have to melt into a puddle before it tripped the breaker.

Just my $0.02.
 
  #19  
Old 04-04-06, 10:40 AM
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>It's just common to say "220"
But it was not from the nameplate.


> Likewise saying "110" is for 110 to 120 volts.

The NEC is our bible and 120V is the blessed name.

I wonder how many people get a voltmeter and discover a voltage problem. Do they call to pocos to complain about having 126V instead of 110V?

I've got a 16V power surge. I want it fixed!


> Would a Swiss appliance intended for 230 volts work there?

The question was whether a Swiss appliance with a 220V nameplate would work in North America. Fortunately, the nameplate is 230V.


> temperature rise and gradient that even the thermostat can't protect it.

If the thermostat can't prevent an overshoot, then such a case does not qualify as one that is controlled. (I certainly did not mean merely that a thermostat had to attempt to control the temperature.)
 
  #20  
Old 04-05-06, 02:35 AM
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Originally Posted by bolide
The NEC is our bible and 120V is the blessed name.
There are plenty of places in NEC that state other values, like 125V or 250V.

Originally Posted by bolide
> temperature rise and gradient that even the thermostat can't protect it.

If the thermostat can't prevent an overshoot, then such a case does not qualify as one that is controlled. (I certainly did not mean merely that a thermostat had to attempt to control the temperature.)
If the heating elements light up like a light bulb because it gets plugged into 347 volts or 480 volts, I think it will do some damage, maybe serious, before the thermostat sensor picks up on it several seconds later. Of course everything will eventually get hot, but certain parts will get hotter faster.

Q: if you build a perfectly insulated room, and put in a 4 watt night light bulb and leave the bulb on, how hot will the room get?
 
  #21  
Old 04-05-06, 03:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Skapare
There are plenty of places in NEC that state other values, like 125V or 250V.
For example?

> I think it will do some damage

As I said, yes, of course, if it is uncontrolled.
Controlled means that it doesn't overshoot the set point.


> Q: if you build a perfectly insulated room,
> and put in a 4 watt night light bulb and leave the bulb on,
> how hot will the room get?

Somewhere around 1600C.
 
  #22  
Old 04-05-06, 03:42 AM
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Originally Posted by idea-catalyst
... if the available outlet was for a window A/C unit, it might have a 30A or 40A breaker...
Very unlikely. The plug is a 20A plug. This is normal for a large window unit. The breaker should be 20A. Anything larger is a Code violation.

But it's a good point. I'll let the OP answer as to what the numbers are on the breaker handles.
 
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