Basement Wiring

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  #1  
Old 04-08-06, 06:56 PM
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Basement Wiring

This may be the wrong forum so I apologize in advance. I am in the process of laying out outlets and canned lights in the basement. I have been reading my shares of internet sites and books. Let me ask anyone who may know. If I run all the outlets in one run in the playroom and all the canned lights in one run in the playroom. Do I then send those two runs to one breaker at the electric panel? Or are those two separate breakers. I would think one breaker could handle both lights and outlets.

Your thoughts?
 
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Old 04-08-06, 09:51 PM
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There's nothing to prevent you from doing this, but I never run lights and receptacles from the same breaker, simply for convenience sake. If you have to work on a receptacle, you have lights. If you have to work on lights, you have lights in the form of a lamp plugged into a receptacle.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 10:06 PM
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I'd put the first outlet as a GFCI at 44" above the floor and leave it tripped.
The other outlets I'd put probably at this same height.

I'm no fan of 120V children's toys (Lite-Brite, Barbie oven).

I'd rather have outlets where I can see them rather than where small children see them.


I hope that no one would send two runs from the same room to the same breaker.
If you have two runs from the same room, you must want two breakers.
Otherwise, you would have only one run from the room.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 10:12 PM
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considerations

the only thing that would stop you from doing this is your power damand. How many light? how many recepticles? A rule of thumb is 1 amp for 100 watts. If you have a 15 amps circuit breaker, you can run 15, 100 watt light bulbs at on time. If you are only going to be putting one or two lights by all means use one breaker. It saves you in wire too. Run your feeder to your switch box, tie your neutrals together and split your hot wire.
Hope this helps,
Mook
 
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Old 04-08-06, 10:33 PM
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You may only use 80% of the overcurrent device (breaker).

15A brkr= 12A load etc.
You ran 2 lines, use them. If you don't have ckts available in your panel, Then install a junction box above (or near) the panel.You don't want 2 wires (conductors) on the same breaker.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 10:42 PM
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> tie your neutrals together and split your hot wire.

How is this any different from "tie your hot wires together and split your neutral"?
 
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