sub panel for a well

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  #1  
Old 04-12-06, 07:22 AM
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sub panel for a well

I have to power a well and sprinkler pump.
the well guy told me i needed two 30 amp breakers and i want to also have a 20 amp circuit. the well and sprinkler pump will be 130 feet from my panel.
Im not sure the best way to do this. I thinking I should install a weather proof sub panel out side close to the well that will handel these. Rather then run 3 circuits from the exsiting panel.

So here are my questions.
What guage wire do i use for the 130 foot run from panel to sub panel.
What size sub panel?
What amp breaker in main panel?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-12-06, 07:56 AM
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You most likely should consider a sub panel, but you need more information.

Why does he say two 30 amp breakers? Does he mean a 240 volt 30 amp breaker?

You need to know the exact requirements for the well, and whatever else you intend to power.

What do you want to do with a 120 volt 20 amp circuit?
 
  #3  
Old 04-12-06, 08:09 AM
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> the well guy told me i needed two 30 amp breakers

Probably one double-pole breaker.
Is this a really huge pump? How many horsepower is it?

> and i want to also have a 20 amp circuit.
> the well and sprinkler pump will be 130 feet from my panel.
> Im not sure the best way to do this. I thinking I should install
> a weather proof sub panel out side close to the well that will
> handle these.
> Rather then run 3 circuits from the exsiting panel.

That's the most flexible option.


> What amp breaker in main [service] panel?
Anything 50A or larger should easily handle what you need so far.


> What size sub panel?
Anything 50A or larger with enough breaker spaces in it for whatever you might want to do.
Panel must be rated no less than than the breaker for the subfeed that you put in the main service panel.
It can be 60A or even 125A. Overrated is fine.


> What gauge wire do I use for the 130 foot run from panel to sub panel.

This depends on what size breaker you put in the main panel.

6 AWG copper with a either 50 or 60A breaker.

You can also go with 100A aluminum mobile home cable and a 60A breaker. The #2 Al will have hardly any voltage drop over that distance.
 
  #4  
Old 04-12-06, 01:29 PM
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the well pump is one horse 240 volt. Well guy said a 30 amp was needed
the sprinkler pump i havent got yet but they range from 1 to 2hp and can run on 120 volt or 240 volt again was told a 30 amp.
the 20 amp is just for a 120 volt outlet and if i need it some time down the road. I would rather have more then i need now.

my main service is 200 amp panel

now im just looking to get the wire and put it in a trench over to where the new panel will go. when i get the sprinkler pump and the sub panel i will be asking more questions.

thanks
 
  #5  
Old 04-12-06, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by jason9
the well pump is one horse 240 volt. Well guy said a 30 amp was needed
I doubt that I've ever seen a 1hp that required more than 15A breaker.

> the sprinkler pump i havent got yet but they range from 1 to 2hp
> and can run on 120 volt or 240 volt again was told a 30 amp.

If you run both on 120V, then you need 30A.


> the 20 amp is just for a 120 volt outlet and if i need it some time down
> the road. I would rather have more than I need now.

Good planning.


50A is plenty for this, 40A would do.
Are you running conduit or direct-burial?
 
  #6  
Old 04-13-06, 09:06 AM
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MOST, not all, 1 HP motors that start under load, such as a pump, will require a breaker larger than 15 AMPs on either voltage. There is a reason there is a whole code section on motors and sizing overload protection.

Electric motors frequently require a larger breaker for starting current than is necessary for them when running. The NEC allows a breaker that is up to 250% of the full load current, which for a 1 HP motor is 25 AMPs (after rounding) for 240 volts, and 40 AMPs for 120 volt. ( this is somewhat variable depending on the motor label data) Do yourself a favor and either put in a relay that prevents both motors from starting at once, in which case I'd install a minimum of a 60 AMP panel, or put in a 100 AMP panel. I'd recommend you run #2 (copper) in any event.
 
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