Tankless Water Heaters

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  #1  
Old 04-16-06, 11:48 AM
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Tankless Water Heaters

I want to install one under a sink in my detached garage, for washing hands, primarily. Was just wondering if anyone has installed one of these for their shop or garage, and, how satisfied are you with its performance.
If you have, maybe you could suggest a particular kind, wattage, amps, how hot it gets, etc.

Here's a little info I found on one site.
I'm assuming the temperature rating is the "increase" in degrees of the water, after it goes through the heater.

Instant-Flow, Low Flow - 0.5 GPM Model

Model #, Watts, Volts, Breaker Size, Temp., Cost


SR-15L-120, 1800, 110/120, 15, 24 F, $199.99
SR-15L-277, 4150, 277, 15, 57 F, $199.99
SR-20L-120, 2400, 110-120, 20, 33 F, $199.99
SR-20L-208, 4160, 208, 20, 57 F, $199.99
SR-20L-240, 4800, 220/240, 20, 65 F, $199.99
SR-20L-277, 5540, 277, 20, 75 F, $199.99
SR-30L-120, 3600, 110/120, 30, 49 F, $199.99

Instant-Flow Standard Flow - 1.0 GPM Model

Model #, Watts, Volts, Breaker Size, Temp., Cost

SR-30-208, 6240, 208, 30, 42 F, $199.99
SR-30-240, 7200, 220/240, 30, 49 F, $199.99
SR-30-277, 8320, 277, 30, 57 F, $199.99
SR-40-208, 8320, 208, 40, 57 F, $199.99
SR-40-240, 9600, 240, 40, 65 F, $199.99
S-90I-277, 9600, 277, 40, 63 F, $199.99
 
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  #2  
Old 04-16-06, 12:06 PM
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Location: Fort Collins, Colorado
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SR-40-240, 9600, 240, 40, 65 F, $199.99
I like this one. Most bang for your buck. Our water is generally pretty cold, so the 65 temperature rise would probably bring cold water to 110, at 1 GPM. At my house, my well generates 12 GPM, probably half that at the end of the line. So your temperature rise wouldn't be 65, I wouldn't think.

What size feeder do you have in the garage now? Any freezers, stuff like that, that would be running while you're washing your hands?
 
  #3  
Old 04-16-06, 12:14 PM
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I do not know anything about these, so I cannot advise in that regard, but I can point out a few things.

I realize that what you have listed is from one web sire, and that other manufacturers have different models, but they will have similar specs.

For your residence, you can eliminate the 208 volt and 277 volt models, as you can only supply 120 or 240 volts. This eliminates about half the models.

If you are installing this from scratch, I would go with one of the 240 volt models. A 240 volt model is more efficient, and allows smaller wire size.
 
  #4  
Old 04-16-06, 12:45 PM
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Rocky, all I will have running is a small fridge, on its own dedicated circuit. I have a 125amp panel, with plenty of available spaces.

Also, I will probably run a 3/4 inch water line to the garage.

racraft, you said: If you are installing this from scratch, I would go with one of the 240 volt models. A 240 volt model is more efficient, and allows smaller wire size.

If I go with a 240volt, that uses a 40amp dp breaker, I would need maybe #8 copper conductor, right? If I went with a 120volt, 30amp breaker, I'd need #10 copper, right?

Just wondering what you meant by smaller wire size for a 240volt model. I must be missing some details.

ps. I think I am planning on using the 240volt model that Rocky Mountain suggested. Thanks Rocky, and, btw, how's the weather there in Ft. Collins? Greeley is magnificent!! I'm working on wiring my garage, as we speak.
Thanks!
 
  #5  
Old 04-16-06, 01:53 PM
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Before installing a tankless water heater, check on the availability of parts and service. Many members here have complained of the problems they had with both. Many plumbers will not work on tankless units. Many units take a long time to get replacement parts. If you are only using it for washing hands, I would look at an RV water heater. 5 Gallons should take care of your needs. Turn it off when you are not in the garage. Good luck.
 
  #6  
Old 04-16-06, 02:10 PM
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What I meant was that for the same wattage heater a 240 volt model needs smaller wire size than a 120 volt model.
 
  #7  
Old 04-16-06, 02:59 PM
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Thanks, racraft . . .

... .dragon, you said . . .If you are only using it for washing hands, I would look at an RV water heater.

What's an RV water heater, and where would I get one, and exactly how does it work? Thanks!
 
  #8  
Old 04-16-06, 03:48 PM
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Just a throw out. I have a small 3 gallon water heater in my shop, runs off 120 volts, heats up the 3 gallons rather quickly, and I can turn it off if I don't plan on being in there for a while. This thing looks like a regular water heater, only dehydrated to a size about 16" high and about 12" round. 1/2" in and out. And it was cheap enough with no expensive replacement parts. The water is hot, no matter what my flow is (for the duration of the 3 gallons) and that is about all I use at one time. Just washing hands. Any more use, and I would probably go with Racraft's suggestion and use a 240 tankless.
 
  #9  
Old 04-16-06, 09:13 PM
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Electric Tankless for small bathroom

Hi,

I have a house that used to be a duplex with a small bathroom upstairs that has a sink and tub with no shower.

We so rarely use hot water in that bathroom that the 40 gallon electric hot water heater sometimes just turns itself off and I have to reset it. The rest of the house is supplied by a gas water heater.

We started remodeling the room with the small electric water heater and when we took the cabinets away that were covering it we could see that there's rust and corrosion around the water fittings leading into and out of the tank.

I've been researching and reading about electric tankless water heaters and I think it may be the best solution because:

1.) There is 240v 50 amp power going to the room because there used to be an electric range.

2.) It would be expensive to run a gas line up there.

3.) We never use the tub and rarely use the sink. I found a model that will run with 50 amp power with plenty of hot water for the sink and just a longer fill time for the tub than normal. Here's a link to the Powerstar model I'm considering:

http://www.tanklesswater.com/product.asp?product=AE12

My question is 2-part:

1.) In examining the breaker panel, I found that the 50 amp 240v double pole breaker for the electric range that used to be there has 2 poles but just one switch. I'm used to seeing double "pull" switches with the 2 switches joined together. I know that they can be purchased like this (I thought maybe they were just very old) but haven't been able to find any explanation of why they would be preferred over the more common "2 switch" breakers. I'm wondering if it's safe to use the existing breaker. and

2.) The wires are cloth rather than romex. This tells me the age of the wiring and that I'll have to get a device that will measure the gauge of the wire so I can make sure it's thick enough for the load and the breaker (who knows who wired this previously). So I'm wondering how safe the cloth covered wiring is if I'm using the correct gauge of wire (6 gauge) with the breaker and load that match.

Any enlightenment will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.
 
  #10  
Old 04-17-06, 04:27 AM
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The more important question is in regards to the wires inside the cable. How many and what what color (insulation) wires are present?
 
  #11  
Old 04-17-06, 05:12 AM
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Willg54,
The RV I was referring to is Recreational Vehicle. Many campers and such have small electric water heaters. I had a 5 gallon in mine.
 
  #12  
Old 04-17-06, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft
The more important question is in regards to the wires inside the cable. How many and what what color (insulation) wires are present?
Not an expert but will add my own experience:
I installed a Titan tankless for a friend that only required two hots and ground. (It had a two conductor with ground "Romex" pigtail for connecting.) My guess is an older stove connection may only be 2/with ground but that should be ok since at least some tankless water heaters only require 2/with ground.

The original poster of the question may want to search for my thread in regard to the installation. My friend uses it for whole house and is happy with the water heater.
 
  #13  
Old 05-07-06, 07:52 PM
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Electric Tankless Waterheater

Thank you for your responses. I have been finishing up another project so I haven't been able to work on this lately.

The insulation on the wire is so faded that I can't really tell the difference between black or red. The white is clearly the middle one which acts as the ground when I test the wires for juice. I'm going to get a wire gauge and a sample of 6 gauge wire to confirm that it is indeed 6 gauge.

Another concern for me besides the insulation was the length of the run which appears to be roughly 20' as it is upstairs and down the wall from the service. I just hope no one ever spliced it anywhere though I can't imagine why they would have.

Thanks
 
  #14  
Old 05-07-06, 09:17 PM
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The insulation on the wire is so faded that I can't really tell the difference between black or red.
So long as the voltage measured between the wires is 240 V color is not important (as long as it isn't green or white).
The white is clearly the middle one which acts as the ground when I test the wires for juice.
Actually it is probably a neutral. Do you have 120v between that wire and each of the other two wires?
 
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