getting insulation off recessed lighting

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  #1  
Old 04-18-06, 10:20 PM
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getting insulation off recessed lighting

I posted this in the accessories (lighting) forum, but figure some might find it useful here as well...
Havent searched to see if someone else has posted this. And anymore these days, most people choose to put insulation rated recessed or canister light in, but, in the off chance you don't have insulation rated lights heres a tip;

Go to the hardware store and pick up some concrete forms in varying widths. They're heavy duty cardboard/paper material. You can cut them down to length with a hacksaw or sawzall or something. If your wiring is already in place, you can cut a slit down one side of the form, this will allow you to slip the form around your recessed light canister and your existing wiring (without having to disconnect and reconnect). You can then, push all your insulation to the outside, and it will keep any insulation from coming into contact with your recessed lights.

I did this on the last home I remodeled, and it worked out great.
 
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Old 04-18-06, 10:52 PM
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> They're heavy-duty cardboard/paper material.

Did you spray thoroughly with flame retardant before installing?
 
  #3  
Old 04-18-06, 11:14 PM
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No. I guess I can see how this forum is going.

I guess I should explain that you shouldnt be using a form that hugs your lightning canister. you want a bit of airspace around it, so as not to catch it on fire (like the insulation problem your trying to avoid should you be in this scenario).

Typically you'll use a 12" diam or larger form, when used in conjunction with your 4" diam (guessing) canister, leaves you 4"+ of airspace around your recessed lighting.

But you can ignore the thread and use your flame retardant insulation instead.

I myself have used forms on larger canisters with 2-3" airspace around it, and havent had any problems since. It sure beats pulling all the insulation a foot away and hoping it doesn't dribble back down toward the light. Heat also tends to rise.
 
  #4  
Old 04-19-06, 01:07 AM
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> I guess I should explain that you shouldnt be using a form that
> hugs your lightning canister.

But they care deeply about each other.

How about leftover scraps of 6" tin duct?
It lies flat for storage. It snaps together with no tools. It has a very high ignition point, certainly higher that 451F.
Tin actually helps to radiate heat away (whereas cardboard is an insulator and tends to trap heat.
 
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