Distance btwn pump and main service panel?

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  #1  
Old 04-19-06, 12:25 PM
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Distance btwn pump and main service panel?

I am getting a new service (60A for pump). As far as I know, there is no local code requirement for the distance btwn pump and main service panel. But wouldn't it be better if I put some distance btwn them? What are your thoughts? (This is a rural setting.)

Second question: I have been looking for a small service panel (outdoor) with main circuit breaker and 3 or 4 slots. Do they make such a thing?

Thanks.
 
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Old 04-19-06, 12:31 PM
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What do you mean you are getting a new service for a pump?
 
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Old 04-19-06, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by puter
wouldn't it be better if I put some distance btwn them?
The closer the better. Touching if possible.

> I have been looking for a small service panel (outdoor) with main circuit
> breaker and 3 or 4 slots. Do they make such a thing?
Yes, though perhaps not less than 100A. 100A and 200A outdoor disconnects are quite common.
 

Last edited by bolide; 04-19-06 at 06:32 PM.
  #4  
Old 04-19-06, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by puter
I am getting a new service (60A for pump).
For a remote irrigation pump, I assume?

But wouldn't it be better if I put some distance btwn them? What are your thoughts?
Closer is better. Longer wires waste energy through a property called "voltage drop." Short, thick wires minimize voltage drop and give you the best efficiency.

I have been looking for a small service panel (outdoor) with main circuit breaker and 3 or 4 slots. Do they make such a thing?
Probably, but it will be cheaper to buy a larger panel simply because they are more common. Plus you might want to add circuits for lighting or something else later; you might as well have the room.
 
  #5  
Old 04-19-06, 06:01 PM
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1) 60A pump only service: no residential building, just irrigation pump for agricultural use of the land. In principle, no lighting, nothing. I am going to add 120V circuit breaker for pump timer.

2) What if the pump discharge pipe breaks and floods meter/panel? That's the kind of situation why I thought about putting some distance between the service panel and the pump. But if pros don't do that, I will follow the suit.

3) I really don't need a large service panel with main circuit breaker and 10-20 empty slots. I am limited to pump only, basically. But if that's what I am going to get, I will buy it.

By the way, 100A disconnect means 100A service panel, right? Or do you mean disconnect with a handle bar?
 
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Old 04-19-06, 06:30 PM
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> What if the pump discharge pipe breaks and floods meter/panel?
Are you installing it below grade?

You can't.

It must be at least 2' above grade, I believe.
It should be higher, like with the meter at least 5' above ground level.

> if pros don't do that, I will follow the suit.
I don't see how it hurts. The disconnect needs to be where the pump equipment is.


> I really don't need a large service panel with main circuit breaker and
> 10-20 empty slots.

Believe me, a 100A disconnect as the smallest thing you would want.
Put in a 60A breaker for service disconnect. I hope you can run the pump right off the lugs.


> By the way, 100A disconnect means 100A service panel, right?

Well, it's tiny as can be. A 60A panel normally has no room for any more breakers.

There is nothing but a latch on the outside.
The only handles are the breakers you install.
 
  #7  
Old 04-19-06, 07:16 PM
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Thanks bolide for kindly replying to each point.

I need to correct myself. I should not have said "flooding." I should have said water spewing from broken PVC discharge line shorting out service panel/meter base.

Yes, the meter base needs to be 5' above ground and main service panel 4' above ground at the panel bottom.

As recommended, I will run wires directly from the main panel to the pump (through timer/controller) in a conduit.
Thanks.
 
  #8  
Old 04-19-06, 08:17 PM
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> I should have said water spewing from broken PVC discharge line
> shorting out service panel/meter base.

The panels are raintight, but that doesn't mean that a high pressure jet can't penetrate.

So your layout should ensure that the panel won't be hit from behind.

No danger of shorting, though.

> I will run wires directly from the main panel to the pump
> (through timer/controller) in a conduit.

Are you talking about my "right off the lugs" remark?

See, my local inspector would let be put a 60A DP breaker for a motor and a 15A breaker for a timer as service disconnects.
The service entrance cable would connect on the main lugs (not a breaker).
It looks like 75A service.
But he'd ask, "What's the load?" If the motor was 26A and the timer was about 0, I'd say 26A; it's a 60A service.
He'd write "Approved for not over 60A" on the inspection sticker.

But you could need a 60A main plus two branch circuits if your service breakers are limited to 60A total. I don't know how it works where you are. You'd have to ask your AHJ.

Otherwise, you'd need a timer that runs off the same circuit which it controls.
 
  #9  
Old 04-22-06, 06:19 PM
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Thank you, bolide,
I went to Lowes to special order a panel with main circuit breaker (100A 8 spaces outdoor) but the computer could not recognize their own part number. I am going there again next Monday. I now know what do do. Thanks.

By the way, my inspector emphasized "pump only." So I suppose the main circuit breaker will be 60A. That should be plenty for me.
 
  #10  
Old 04-25-06, 12:07 AM
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According to code, service disconnects must be within sight of equipment. Within sight of is 25ft. You'll find this in the definitions of the code book.
 
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Old 04-25-06, 12:36 AM
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Wink NEC 100: "in sight of"

Originally Posted by jamead65
According to code, service disconnects must be within sight of equipment. Within sight of is 25ft. You'll find this in the definitions of the code book.
It used to be 15m (50'). Did you get it halved?
 
  #12  
Old 04-25-06, 01:28 PM
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correction

My apologies bolide, you are correct about the distance. Going off top of my head back when I worked in oil refineries several years ago. my bad......
 
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