Questions about new garage circuit


  #1  
Old 04-24-06, 08:19 AM
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Questions about new garage circuit

Hi,
I am hoping someone can offer some advice on wiring a new garage.

Here is what I have roughed in so far:

1 receptacle for the GDO
3 extra receptacles for general use

2 basic ceiling fixtures to light interior of garage (will use high efficiency bulbs ~11w each)
2 front pot lights (also running ~11watt bulbs each)
2 rear pot lights (~11watt bulbs each)
(The interior light and front and rear pot lights would be switched with 3 switches)

I was thinking of running one line (14/2) into a junction box in the garage, and then running to the receptacles and 3 switches etc.

My main question is:
How much of a load would these things be? And how many more, if any, lights, receptacles etc. could still be on this same circuit? I am thinking of tying into an existing fuse that has other things running on it already, but of course I do not want to overload it.

Also:
Would all these items be ok to make up 1 circuit?
What amps fuse would I need?
Would a 14/2 main line in be ok to feed these things?

Thanks for the help!

Jason
 
  #2  
Old 04-24-06, 08:43 AM
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I WOULD NOT PUT ALL OF THIS ON ONE CIRCUIT ESPECIALLY A CIRCUIT THAT ALREADY HAS A LOAD ON IT. PERSONALLY I WOULD HAVE ONE CIRCUIT FOR LIGHTING AND AT LEAST TWO SEPERATE CIRCUITS IN THE GARAGE FOR RECEPTACLES, YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU ARE GOING TO PLUG IN ie. BLOCK HEATERS, OUTDOOR LIGHTS, MACHINERY ETC. CHECK YOUR STATE/ PROVINCIAL ELECTRICAL CODE BECAUSE I KNOW THERE ARE RULES ABOUT GARAGES IN THE ONTARIO ELECTRICAL CODE.
 
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Old 04-24-06, 08:51 AM
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Do not run 14 gage wire period. Any new circuits should only be 20 amp circuits, which means 12 gage wire.

Is this an attached or detached garage>

If this is an attached agrage then I would run at least two 20 amp circuits circuits for what you want.

If this is a detached garage then I would seriously consider a sub panel for the garage. At the minimum I would run a 20 amp multiwire circuit to the garage.

The lights and the opener can go on a single circuit, and then you have a second circuit for the receptacles. Remember to GFCI protect them.

Don't even consider using an existing circuit. That is just asking for trouble.
 
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Old 04-24-06, 08:52 AM
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Just Noticed You Are In Ontario.rule 26-724 At Least 1 Branch Circuit Shall Be Provided solely For Receptacles That Are Located Outdoors. At Least 1 Branch Circuit Shall Be Provided For Receptacles In A Car Port Or Garage Of A Single Dwelling Except That The Lighting Fixtures And Garage Door Operator For These Areas May Be Connected To This Circuit.
Also Remember That The Electrical Code Is Just The Minimum ( I Mean Sh**iest ) That Needs Be Done. Always Try To Do Better Than Code Requires
 
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Old 04-24-06, 08:56 AM
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[QUOTE=racraft]Do not run 14 gage wire period. Any new circuits should only be 20 amp circuits, which means 12 gage wire.

DON'T LISTEN TO RACRAFT, YOU CANT RUN A 20 AMP CIRCUIT TO THE GARAGE FOR RECEPTACLES. REMEMBER RACRAFT OUR ELECTRICAL CODES ARE STRICTER THAN YOUR YANKEE RULES
 
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Old 04-24-06, 09:04 AM
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Dude, chill OUT!!

Assuming Racraft IS wrong (and you don't really say how as I would assume a 20A circuit might be more strict than a 15A circuit...) please show some respect in how you correct one of our most valuable members.

And lay off the all-caps. It makes the post take twice as long to read.

Now, welcome. We look forward to your insight in future posts.
 
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Old 04-24-06, 09:06 AM
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I am not completely familiar with Canadian codes.

However, not allowing a 20 amp circuit for a garage does not make sense at all. If in fact a 20 amp circuit for a garage is not allowed in Canada, then simply substitute 15 amp whwre I have typed 20 amp.

shawnyc, please stop typing in all uppercase letters. it is considered to be shouting, is hard to read and is rude.
 
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Old 04-24-06, 09:29 AM
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Sorry always forget cap lock on. I'm almost certain that the only time you use a 20 amp circuit is for an alternative to kitchen splits and then you must use T-slot receptacle
 
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Old 04-24-06, 11:43 AM
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Again, my knowledge of Canadian code is not that great.

I do know that on a 20 amp circuit 20 amp receptacles are required. Because of this many people prefer 15 amp circuits, because 20 amp devices are more expensive.

I also know that I have never heard that 20 amp circuits are prohibited in any place or locations. Maybe they are, or maybe they are less convenient, but I have never hard of them being plain not allowed.

If I running a circuit to a detached garage, I would certainly bit the bullet and make it a 20 amp circuit if I weren't putting in a sub panel, assuming it is allowed..
 
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Old 04-24-06, 12:50 PM
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OK Shawn - Now that you've po'd a bunch of people, why doesn't the Canadian electrical code allow a 20 amp circuit in a garage? Are you guys limited to 15 amp circuits? Seems to me that would be a lot less strict than our lax Yankee standards.

Racraft - You're response was a lot more tactful than mine would have been.
 
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Old 04-24-06, 12:59 PM
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I stand corrected rule 26-710(b). 20 amp is allowed. Maybe this is common practice in US but I've only seen 20A receptacles used as an alternate to a kitchen split or for A/C's or copiers. Not really used much up here for rezi work
 
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Old 04-24-06, 01:14 PM
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A 20 amp circuit can supply one third more power than a 15 amp circuit. In the US we do not have to use 20 amp devices on a 20 amp circuit (unless it is a dedicated circuit). The reason that i (and so many others) recommend a 20 amp circuit is because of the increased power.

Yes, there is increased cost. 12 gage cable costs more than 14 gage cable. 12 gage wire costs more than 14 gage wire. But not a lot more. 12 gage wire is a little harder to work with, and it increases box fill faster. But if you are planning your circuits carefully and buying large boxes, you can avoid the box fill issue.


We still don't know, in this case, if this is an attached or detached garage. In the US you can run one circuit to an outbuilding. That one circuit can be a sub panel, or a multi wire circuit, or a single 120 volt circuit. I would certainly recommend a multi wire circuit over a single 120 volt circuit. Whether or not I would recommend a sub panel is a different question. At any rate, I would recommend 20 amps over 15 amps.
 
 

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