does 40g to 50g require new electrical connections

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  #1  
Old 05-02-06, 01:50 PM
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does 40g to 50g require new electrical connections

We have a 40g water heater that we are going to replace. I thought about getting a 50g but was told that would require new electrical connections due to the increase power draw. Is that correct?

Also, we will be doing it ourselves so we are left with HD's GE or Lowe's Whirlpool or Sears' Kenmore. Any advice?
 
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Old 05-02-06, 02:05 PM
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kimski, Welcome to the DIY Forums.
I have never heard of that but I am a plumber, not an electrician. I am going to move your post to electrical for the best answer. Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 05-02-06, 02:21 PM
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The answer is maybe.

The typical electric water heater circuit in the US is a 30 amp circuit requiring 10 gage wire. Some smaller water heaters may be able to get by with a 20 amp 12 gage wire circuit, but generally that is for smaller than 40 gallon size.

Look at the size of your existing circuit breaker feeding the water heater, and if possible the cable from the panel to the water heater.

If you have a 30 amp circuit then you will not have a problem with a typical 50 gallon water heater.
 
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Old 05-02-06, 09:20 PM
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as Racraft speaking about water heater i do agree with him with this set up but let me go one more step further to understand more clear as well


most 40 et 50 gallon water heaters genrally have 4500 watt heating element that will draw about roughly 18.75 amp you can squeak by with 20 amp but i will not recomened to run on 20 amp at all most water heater circuit are useally wired with #10 gauge size which it will handle up to 30 amp load so there are some water heater can go high as 6500 watts [ kinda rare but it is in market in few spots] 5500 about the top for most useage

and when you hook up new water heater make sure the connetions is very good and tight and also the water heater junction box is kinda small so give you a quick head up when you spicing the wire in there.

if you are replacing old electric water heater which it have 20 amp circuit it will be wise time to run new wire anyway because near constant loading on wire can get pretty warm along the way.

merci, marc
 
  #5  
Old 05-03-06, 04:40 AM
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Have 30A

Luckily I have a 30A circuit so I can go from my 40g to 50g w/o any problems. Thanks.

I would like to know your thoughts on brands - HD GE, Lowe's Whirlpool or Sears Kenmore? Plumbers costs are way too high for the labor so we are going to do it ourselves (we've done one before). Our city requires a permit so they'll make sure it is done right.
 
  #6  
Old 05-03-06, 05:11 AM
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Kimski,
Check the energy sticker (yellow and black) on the side of the unit. Read and understand what any warranties are and what is covered and how its covered. Some warranties cover parts for so many years and labor for so many. Since you are installing it, the labor won't be important. See what steps have to be taken if warranty work is needed. Some companies make you get it inspected by a company rep. Main idea here is to know what you are getting for your money. Good luck.
 
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