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  #1  
Old 05-04-06, 05:34 AM
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quick question

can i splice two ground wires together that run from two sub panels to one ground rod? so ground rod to a box then split? or should i just run to ground rod twice?
 
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  #2  
Old 05-04-06, 05:37 AM
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Something does not sound right.

You should not have two sub panels with ground rod connections from the same building.

Please describe your setup in more detail.
 
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Old 05-04-06, 06:03 AM
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The place is huge. It's an old summer resort. the people that bought it wanted to make it a year round resort. The wiring was very old, so we started by removing the old wire and bring the rooms up to code. The owners remodeled some rooms to make it into a suite. They wanted to add a small kitchen, baseboard heat. There is no immediate access to cold water pipes. most of our wiring is coming through the attic, all of the plumbing is from below. We added a sub panel in the attic, with a seperate ground rod. So my question is can i splice into that wire or should i add a seperate rod for that panel?
 
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Old 05-04-06, 06:07 AM
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A sub panel in the same building as the main panel should not be grounded to an external source. It is grounded back to the panel that feeds it, through the ground wire as part of the four wire feed to the sub panel.
 
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Old 05-04-06, 06:13 AM
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So your saying that i should disconnect it from the rod and just pick it up from the main panel? Another quick question, the wire that i have has 2 bare sets of wires in it, shouldnt the neutral be insulated?
 
  #6  
Old 05-04-06, 06:32 AM
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You need four conductors. The three current carrying conductors (the two hots and the neutral) need to be insulated and sized appropriately. The ground can be insulated or bare, and must also be sized appropriately.

Should you really be doing this work without first knowing exactly what you need to do?
 
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Old 05-04-06, 06:49 AM
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Its not that i dont know what im doing, usually your supposed ground to all available means. cold water pipe, rods, plates, ect. I just wasnt sure being that the sub panel is over 100' away from the main. And there wasnt anything else to ground too. Thanks for your time.
 
  #8  
Old 05-04-06, 07:21 AM
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Sorry Dunka but it sounds like you are way over your head. Please get some qualified help with your situation before you create a very dangerous condition and someone gets hurt.

Again, you should not have 2 bare conductors in your cable.
 
  #9  
Old 05-04-06, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by dunka11us
It's not that i don't know what i'm doing,
How do you know?


> usually you're supposed ground to all available means.
Is a subpanel in the same building the usual case?


> I just wasnt sure being that the sub panel is over 100' away from the main.
> And there wasnt anything else to ground too.
A subpanel is grounded to the panel from which it is fed.
It must be.

If there are additional objects to "ground", I don't mind if you bond them to the nearest panel, but there is no reason to bond any one electrode to more than one subpanel.


That you would ever consider sharing an electrode between subpanels tell us that you do not know what you are doing.
In fact, it says that you lack an academic understanding of the purposes of grounding and bonding.

That you would consider having two bare conductors says that you do not know proper wiring methods for subpanels.

I suggest that you admit that you need to learn a lot about the fundamentals - and start learning.
 
  #10  
Old 05-04-06, 10:08 AM
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thats why u guys are here. I am def not an electrician, I am studying the NEC and trying to prepare myself for the test. i work with an electrician, hes been on vacation comin back on monday, hes goin to look through everything when he gets back. nothing is live yet so no worries.
Is there any other material that u guys would suggest for me to read?
 
  #11  
Old 05-04-06, 11:13 AM
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What test are you trying to prepare yourself to take? In my area the masters test requires 7 years of documented work experience.

From your posts it does not seem like you have anywhere near the amount of experience or knowledge to test. You should at least have a better understanding of the basic terminology, not toe mention a better understanding of therory
 
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