PVC or EMT

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  #1  
Old 05-09-06, 03:15 PM
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PVC or EMT

Hi,
I got to run 220 to my new well about 30' from the house. The breaker panel is inside the house. Didn't I read some where that PVC conduit is not allowed when connected to an inside panel? Can cause some kind of gas or something???

thanks, jim
 
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Old 05-09-06, 03:45 PM
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PVC conduit is acceptable and prefered in this situation. It is much cheaper and easier to work with than EMT. Use schedule 80 PVC for the vertical portions of the run (into and out of the ground) and schedule 40 PVC for the horizontal underground portions of the run. Use THWN (wet) rated conductors in the conduit. The conduit should be buried at least 18".
 

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  #3  
Old 05-09-06, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by JIMS 71
Didn't I read some where that PVC conduit is not allowed when connected to an inside panel? Can cause some kind of gas or something???
PVC conduit (or wire insulation) is not allowed inside air handling ducts or equipment because of the hazardous fumes released as it burns. This is rarely important in a residential setting as the air handling plenum is ducted and not shared with other utilities.
 
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Old 05-09-06, 03:59 PM
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Thanks for the clarification, I'm going with that flex type. Water tight, easier to use...jim
 
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Old 05-09-06, 07:13 PM
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Originally Posted by JIMS 71
Thanks for the clarification, I'm going with that flex type. Water tight, easier to use...jim
Do you mean ENT (blue color)? That's different from PVC. I may be wrong but I don't think it is suitable for exposure to moisture (the fittings I've seen aren't moisture resistant for example) but I'll let the experts way in if your talking about ENT (aka Smurf).
 
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Old 05-10-06, 08:22 AM
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The stuff I've been looking at is gray, flexible w moisture tight fittings.
 
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Old 05-10-06, 08:43 AM
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Moisture tight means nothing. Condensation causes water to develop in outside coinduit.
 
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Old 05-10-06, 08:46 AM
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OK, so is this the right stuff?
 
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Old 05-10-06, 02:21 PM
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No, I believe you are describing Liquidtight Flex which is not suitable for an underground run. You should be using RNC (Rigid Nonmetal Conduit) which is a grey PVC pipe. The RNC comes in two strengths, sch 40 and sch 80. Sch 80 should be used for the vertical run into and out of the ground; sch 40 should be used for the underground horizontal run. Use the pre-made fittings (sweeps, LBs) for PVC conduit.

Liquidtight is for short outdoor connections, such as a disconnect box to an air conditioner.
 
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Old 05-11-06, 08:30 AM
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Ahhhhhh, I see, thank you.
 
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