Step up transformer for an air compressor?

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-09-06, 03:17 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4
Step up transformer for an air compressor?

Hello everyone,

Looking for some advice and the best possible solution \ least expensive for the following:

I have a Ingersoll-Rand 60 gal. Air Compressor, 230V-1Ph 5 hp motor Vertical Tank, 5 hp Twin Cylinder and I have no available room in my 100 amp circuit panel.

What are my options?

1. Can I buy a beefy 110 to 240 step up transformer to plug into the wall to run my compressor, or would it not be very practical?

2. Is there anyway to moves things around in my panel where I won't have to install a sub panel?

I have an 100 amp circuit panel and they build these newer houses with no extra room for other things, plus I will be selling the house soon and don't want to waste the expense on a temp setup?

Thanks in advance for your help!

Nate
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-09-06, 03:24 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Forget trying to create 240 volts from 120. Where would you attach your 120 volt circuit?

See if your panel accepts tandem breakers. If it does then install two tandem breakers, feeing up two spaces for a 240 volt breaker. If it does not then install a sub panel.
 
  #3  
Old 05-09-06, 03:28 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4
Originally Posted by racraft
Forget trying to create 240 volts from 120. Where would you attach your 120 volt circuit?

See if your panel accepts tandem breakers. If it does then install two tandem breakers, feeing up two spaces for a 240 volt breaker. If it does not then install a sub panel.

Thanks...This is what I needed to know. How do I determine if my panle accepts tandem breakers?
 
  #4  
Old 05-09-06, 03:32 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Look at the label inside the panel. It may state something like 20-30 or 20-40, meaning 20 spaces and capable of 30 or 40 loads. Sometimes you are also limited to where in the panel the tandems can be installed.
 
  #5  
Old 05-09-06, 08:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4
Originally Posted by racraft
Look at the label inside the panel. It may state something like 20-30 or 20-40, meaning 20 spaces and capable of 30 or 40 loads. Sometimes you are also limited to where in the panel the tandems can be installed.

OK I looked and its a 16\24, all of the slots are in use but I only see 2 tandem breakers for a total of 18 circuits, not including the main circuit breaker which would be two more, if these are counted? Looks like I might just be able to get the compressor hooked up after all, need to call an electrician to look at it.
 
  #6  
Old 05-10-06, 07:33 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Do not count the main breaker. It sounds like you can add two tandems (either 15 or 20 amp) and be able to remove two full size breakers, freeing up two spots for a 240 volt breaker.

If you don't feel comfortable working the panel then calling an electrician is the way to go.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes