FROM dimmer switch TO reg outlet

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  #1  
Old 05-11-06, 12:47 PM
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FROM dimmer switch TO reg outlet

I am attaching pics of a current project that looks simple enough but I just cant get to work. Previously this was an outlet + a dimmer switch. I want to rewire it to be an outlet alone. Please advice...
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  #2  
Old 05-11-06, 12:52 PM
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before i can able answer this question what the dimmer was used to hook to the light fixure ??

or you try to get rid of dimmer switch but where is the ceiling lumiaire [ light fixure ] ??

if there is no ceiling lumiaires at all you must have a switched repectaile [ this is required by code either have ceiling lumiaire or switched rep.]

please explain more details then we can guide you in correct way

Merci , Marc
 
  #3  
Old 05-11-06, 01:00 PM
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Yes, please tell us what the dimmer controlled, and what you did with what the dimmer controlled.

Generally speaking, when you eliminate a switch you simply wire nut together the two wires that were attached to the switch.
 
  #4  
Old 05-11-06, 08:14 PM
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Dont know if this will help?

before i can able answer this question, what the dimmer was used to hook to the light fixure ??or you try to get rid of dimmer switch but where is the ceiling lumiaire [ light fixure ] ??
This was in place when we bought the house. There is NO ceiling lights, fans, etc in this room so I cant say what the purpose of the dimmer was for. Could it of control the actual electrical outlet that it shares the box with? I honestly do not know.....

if there is no ceiling lumiaires at all you must have a switched repectaile [ this is required by code either have ceiling lumiaire or switched rep.]
please explain more details then we can guide you in correct way

Merci , Marc[/QUOTE]

The family that owned the home previously did all kinds of shoty work around the house (which we have slowly but surely attempted to fix) but this one....I dont know. The box had a traditional receptacle and next to that a dimmer switch was wired in. Dont know if this is going to help but it's all I got!
 
  #5  
Old 05-11-06, 08:38 PM
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History of the outlet

I got another response asking for more of a history of the outlet and what's been going on. Here is my response to that if it helps at all:
Thanks for bearing with my Laymans terms....This outlet has not worked properly for over a year now. Sometimes it worked sometimes it was dead. A clock was plugged into it so I could tell when it was operational and when it went dead. Of course when it went dead the three outlets after it were dead also. When I finally got in there to check it out I found the dimmer switch was attached. Not being versed in this kind of work I thought maybe the dimmer switch was effecting the outlet and why it was going dead all the time. I took the dimmer switch off and took its wires and put them into the back of the existing outlet and the outlet worked fine for about 2 months (and of course the other outlets too) until I plugged my vacuum cleaner into an outlet in that circuit and everything went dead again. I guess I am wondering if there is something I over looked or am I wiring all 6 wires into the outlet correctly? AAArrrgggg........
 
  #6  
Old 05-12-06, 04:27 AM
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You should never be guessing. Guessing is a sure way to get someone hurt or killed.

It is not allowed by code for a dimmer switch to control, a receptacle. Dimmers are only allowed for hardwired devices, like lights.

If you remove a switch, you should connect the switch wires (except the ground) together with a wire nut. This makes whatever was controlled by the switch always hot. Plugging the wires into the back of a receptacle is almost always going to be wrong, as switches have no neutral.

As for your intermittent receptacles, you have a loose connection. The high current draw of the vacuum caused the loose connection to open. To fix this you need to check all the connections on the circuit. Remake all wire nutted connections and move any back stabbed connections to the screw terminals.
 
  #7  
Old 05-12-06, 10:50 AM
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more info......

You should never be guessing. Guessing is a sure way to get someone hurt or killed.
Amen, that's one of the main reasons I am here.

It is not allowed by code for a dimmer switch to control, a receptacle. Dimmers are only allowed for hardwired devices, like lights.
I know this to be true but there are no lights, fans, etc under the control of the dimmer that are visable to me.

If you remove a switch, you should connect the switch wires (except the ground) together with a wire nut. This makes whatever was controlled by the switch always hot. Plugging the wires into the back of a receptacle is almost always going to be wrong, as switches have no neutral.
I tried capping the 1 blk and 1 wht from the dimmer switch together and it does have a ground hooked stationary to the back of the elect box. But that did not work.

As for your intermittent receptacles, you have a loose connection. The high current draw of the vacuum caused the loose connection to open. To fix this you need to check all the connections on the circuit. Remake all wire nutted connections and move any back stabbed connections to the screw terminals.
The receptacles AFTER the problem area are all new. And the problem area is the only one with the backstabs being used. So you are saying that I can wire 3 black to the 2 screw terminals and 3 whites the same way? I didnt know if that could be done and I was afraid to try it.
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  #8  
Old 05-12-06, 10:55 AM
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No, you cannot wire three wires to two screw terminals. You need to add a wire nut and a pigtail, for at least two of the wires.
 
  #9  
Old 05-12-06, 01:18 PM
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We are almost there

OK, I have attached 2 different pictures of wire nut/pigtail connectors. I plan to use it on 2 of the blacks and connect them to the outlet screw #1 and the other black to screw #2. Sounds correct? Click on link to see the connectors.
And THANKS!!
LINK FOR PIC:
http://www.tupics.com/basic/ohcheap1/pig2.jpg
 
  #10  
Old 05-12-06, 04:14 PM
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Those do not look correct.

Buy a small bag of wire nuts in the electrical department of the big box store. Then buy a piece of 14-2 or 12-2 cable (or use a piece you have around) and make six to eight inch pigtails.
 
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