Bathroom GFI code???

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  #1  
Old 05-16-06, 12:46 PM
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Question Bathroom GFI code???

We're enlarging a bathroom (essentially making it all new) and have a few code questions regarding GFI outlets.

Do GFI outlets have to be on their own circuit separate from anything else like lights?

Is there any code as to the number of GFI's required per lineal feet of wall (like regular receptacles)?

I know that if the first receptacle in a string of outlets is a GFI feeding the rest it works for all, but even so, all receptacles in a bathroom must each be a GFI right?

Thanks guys!
 
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Old 05-16-06, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by syakoban
Do GFI outlets have to be on their own circuit separate from anything else like lights?
No, however there are circuit requirements for a bathroom. Bathroom receptacles must be served by a 20A circuit. This circuit may serve all of the loads (receptacles, lights, fans) in a single bathroom; or, the receptacles (no lights, no fan) in one or more bathrooms. Bathroom receptacle circuits may not serve loads outside of bathrooms; bathroom light circuits may serve other loads elsewhere in the house.

Is there any code as to the number of GFI's required per lineal feet of wall (like regular receptacles)?
No, each bathroom must have a GFCI protected receptacle within 36" of the sink basin.

I know that if the first receptacle in a string of outlets is a GFI feeding the rest it works for all, but even so, all receptacles in a bathroom must each be a GFI right?
No, only the first receptacle needs to be a GFCI (or use a GFCI breaker for the entire circuit). Some people recommend using individual GFCI receptacles so you don't have to walk as far to reset a trip, however this is not a requirement.
 
  #3  
Old 05-16-06, 01:10 PM
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Thanks ibpooks ! That clarified it.

Our other bath will get fixed in the process too... it currently just about violates everything you mentioned...

So since both baths are adjacent, I can arrange one GFI circuit for both room's GFI's, so long as it is just for GFI's, right?
 
  #4  
Old 05-16-06, 01:27 PM
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You can run one circuit for both bathroom's receptacles. Put only the receptacles on this circuit.

Ideally, use one GFCI receptacle in each bathroom.

Second best would be one GFCI receptacle on the first receptacle.

Third best would be a GFCI breaker.
 
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Old 05-16-06, 01:32 PM
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Thanks racraft!

Actually, I forgot one thing... the "new" bathroom is supposed to have a GFI in the wall and another in a door that opens in the vanity where the hair dryer gets hidden. If they are both GFI's is there any issue or anything special to be done for the "hidden" vanity GFI?

Thanks!
 
  #6  
Old 05-16-06, 01:44 PM
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If you want to put in two GFCI receptacles then go ahead, but it's a waste of money. Use only the LINE terminals of the receptacles.

You would be better off saving your money and making the second receptacle a normal (non-GFCI) receptacle and feeding from the LOAD terminals of the first GFCI.
 
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Old 05-16-06, 02:13 PM
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Question

OK, I have taken this all in and incorporated it on my wiring diagram for my permit application. If you don't mind having a look and letting me know if I got it right or not, it's at

http://www.spia.net/stuff/bathroom_wiring.gif

Thanks again!
 
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Old 05-16-06, 02:29 PM
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That's a nice drawing. What software are you using?

One thing I noticed is that I don't see a need for the circled J (for junction box) at the switch locations. I just use (and usually see) the esses for the switches and that's it. It would be assumed that they are in a box that can also be used as a junction box. Just might make plans slightly more clear if they get small and detailed at times.
 
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Old 05-16-06, 03:14 PM
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Thanks for the compliment... I know that a draftsman doesn't make an electrician though. It's just AutoCAD.

I put the J boxes in to show that the switches are on more than one circuit, just to be safe w/the inspector.

So does that mean my GFI circuit is OK???
 
  #10  
Old 05-16-06, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by syakoban
So does that mean my GFI circuit is OK???
Sorry, yeah, that looked fine, unless I missed something...
 
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