Q: Standard Receptacles

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Old 05-19-06, 10:30 AM
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Question Q: Standard Receptacles

Standard wall outlets can be wired either through the holes in the back or with the screws on the sides.

One method saves a lot of time if doing a big job, but the other seems to be a safer, more secure technique.

My question is, does screwing the wires to the receptacle result in more electrical contact than poking them through the back?
 
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Old 05-19-06, 10:32 AM
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I can't count how many times a back stabbed outlet has been the cause of a headache. They fail all the time.
 
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Old 05-19-06, 10:37 AM
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Got to agree, I am amazed they are not ruled out. They are also rated for 14 wire which is a less than ideal for general use circuits (imo). Back stabs are also different than backwired which are good.
 
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Old 05-19-06, 10:44 AM
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The amount of contact in either method is sufficient for the 15 plus amps that might need to flow through it.

The issue is whether the method of contact will hold for the long haul. Most of the time it does. However, some of the time it does not.

Use the screw terminals. You, and anyone else who owns the house, will appreciate it.
 
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Old 05-19-06, 10:46 AM
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I have dealt with this alot with my service calls with backstabbing repectiales is most common curpit for failure due the very small concat area with spring loaded "finger" to hold the wire in place.
[ most backstabbed are genrally only take #14 gauge wire size only ]


anyway the backwired is very diffrent than backstabbed,,

the backwired mean have real clamp with screw it will tighen up good just like a wire wrapped around the screw to get it tighten.

My question is, does screwing the wires to the receptacle result in more electrical contact than poking them through the back?
yes this is true expect for backwiring

the same thing with switches as well you will noted that.

the other thing about the backstabbed devices they are very hard to remove if want to replace it [ i useally end up snip the wires off and just remove insluation and redo and make correct connection ]


Merci , Marc
 
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Old 05-20-06, 11:36 AM
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I had a conversation with a counter guy (very good, well informed and reputable guy). He claimed the current versions of this are better than they were in the past. Although this info was from the man. rep., I do believe there to be some truth to it. How could the manuf. NOT improve the product given all the problems of the past.

Although I am in agreement with what the other posters have stated and still will not use them. Why take the chance? Side wire doesn't take that long.

Back wired is my preference but is also the most expensive.
 
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Old 05-20-06, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by sberry27
Got to agree, I am amazed they are not ruled out.
As I also am amazed that they have not ruled out sending black and white thin rubber coated light socket wires thru the same small metal (of all things)grommet hole in those elcheapo home center light fixtures that retain a lot of heat under the enclosed globe... and people put in 100 watt bulbs to get more light.

I have heard the argument on this board that you can't protect people from their own ignorance. But in the case of the light fixtures that undergo wire melt down due to this over sight (and tenants not having a clue, or kids or ?), as most people are electrical illiterates, should not be disregarded as simple ignorance. Someone should make light manufacturers change this.

I have had to change out light fixtures where I have seen those 2 wires inside, crispy-critterred and the insulation burned off/brittle wires, almost contacting each other..and very well could contact each other or maybe shock the bulb changer when someone tightend a bulb in the next time with the socket wiggling around.
 
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Old 05-20-06, 06:03 PM
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I've replaced three fixtures in two different homes in the last two weeks for 100W lamps in a 60W fixture. One of which required a new cable from the switch because the wires had been too destroyed by the heat.

What the heck, it's just a label. If the lamp fits, stick it in there!! Idiots.
 
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Old 05-22-06, 06:41 AM
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Originally Posted by french277V
I have dealt with this alot with my service calls with backstabbing repectiales is most common curpit for failure due the very small concat area with spring loaded "finger" to hold the wire in place.
[ most backstabbed are genrally only take #14 gauge wire size only ]


anyway the backwired is very diffrent than backstabbed,,

the backwired mean have real clamp with screw it will tighen up good just like a wire wrapped around the screw to get it tighten.




yes this is true expect for backwiring

the same thing with switches as well you will noted that.

the other thing about the backstabbed devices they are very hard to remove if want to replace it [ i useally end up snip the wires off and just remove insluation and redo and make correct connection ]


Merci , Marc
Jack here..Now "back-wiring"(VS. backstabbing) is where you stick the conductor in the back hole but you have to tighten the side screw to fasten it, correct?

Thanks for the correction if I'm not.
 
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Old 05-22-06, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Jackofalltradez
Jack here..Now "back-wiring"(VS. backstabbing) is where you stick the conductor in the back hole but you have to tighten the side screw to fasten it, correct?
Correct. The screw then clamps a metal plate onto the wire. These connections are almost always found on GFCI receptacles and on the "commercial grade" receptacles. It is the best connection you can get on a receptacle.
 
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Old 05-22-06, 11:29 AM
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What the heck, it's just a label. If the lamp fits, stick it in there!! Idiots.
MAC702 - The real problem isn't that people are idiots, the manufacturers and the trade in general are to cheap to correct the problem - if in fact it is a problem.
Cheapo lamps are made with a cheapo sticker that says to use a maximum of 60 watt bulbs. Along with the lamp may be a cheapo piece of paper, or a box, printed in a semi legible micro font in 5 different languages, giving the same warning. None of which survive the installation.
A 100 watt bulb fits a 60 watt rated socket. If there is a safety issue that's where it lies, the problem is the design not the people you call idiots.
BTW - I wonder how many lights still have their 60 watt warning labels after a few years use?
 
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Old 05-22-06, 11:34 AM
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The issue is not with the manufacturers, but with the users.

Everyone wants their appliances as cheap as possible. So they buy the cheap lamp instead of the more expensive one. The manufacturers, eager to sell product, give people what they want.
 
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Old 05-22-06, 01:24 PM
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Thanks for all the input, folks!

Two surprises as a result of my inquiry:

First - I didn't know that a back-screw job, as opposed to back stab, was actually better than the side screw.

Next. I re-did two kitchen and one living room receptacle over the weekend - old back-jab jobs converted to side-screw.

Those appliances running off the kitchen receptacles warm up faster and the TVs running off the living room/bedroom wall circuit have more vivid color/contrast and are so sharp I had to re-calibrate them with "AVIA Home Theater Companion"! I had already gotten good pictures on the sets with the DVD, but nothing like this. None of the picture settings: Contrast, Color, Sharpness, are past the halfway point, and some had to be turned down to look correct on the test pattern.

Not for nothing, but I also had to lower my surround & main speaker settings slightly and re-balance. The bass is solid without boominess and instruments and vocals are much clearer. I'm surprised that just changing the way a few receptacles are wired can make such a difference.
 

Last edited by Jackofalltradez; 05-22-06 at 02:10 PM.
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