Pool Timer Install Question

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  #1  
Old 06-02-06, 01:02 PM
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Question Pool Timer Install Question

"Cross posted from Pools and Spas"

I would like to add a timer to my pump motor in an effort to save some energy. I have done simple household wiring {moved 220 A/C plug location & wired for an electrically dryer}and am confident that I can do this. I know the motor is 220 and is on a 40 amp breaker. I found a timer that meets this and know that the wiring has to be in conduit. But what I cannot get clarified is the guage wiring I need to use. All my local pool suppliers tell me that it has to be the same as I currently have, but the wires are so old that I cannot read the markings. Any and all advise would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Doug
 
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  #2  
Old 06-02-06, 01:10 PM
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40 amps typically requires 8 gage wire.
 
  #3  
Old 06-02-06, 02:04 PM
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THAT breaker sounds WAY oversized for a pool pump motor. Is that all that is on the circuit? Anything else?

You seriously need to read the plate on the motor itself and determine the correct size of breaker. I could be way off base, but I really don't think so...
 
  #4  
Old 06-02-06, 05:58 PM
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Wink Additional info

Ok I am wording it wrong - sorry people. It is 2 20 amp breakers. One for each hot lead = the 220. I pulled the cover off the pump and it has 12 guage wire. This is what I had thought but wanted to ask the pros.

The label is completely worn off the pump so basically useless and the pool people did not want to commit since they were not electricians. I am going to get my materials tomorrow after work and do the job on Sunday unless I hear any on the contrary.

Thanks,

Doug
 
  #5  
Old 06-02-06, 06:05 PM
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It is 2 20 amp breakers
.Hopefully they are tied together at the handles????
I pulled the cover off the pump and it has 12 guage wire.
Good, that is the minimum for a 20 amp circuit breaker..
I am going to get my materials tomorrow after work and do the job on Sunday unless I hear any on the contrary.
So what are you going to get??
 
  #6  
Old 06-02-06, 07:28 PM
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20 amps makes more sense than 40 amps. Use 12 gage wire. What the pump has internal is not important. You need wire sized for the breaker. Remember, no cable, you must use individual conductors in conduit, of the appropriate colors.
 
  #7  
Old 06-05-06, 07:22 AM
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Thumbs up Timer Done!!!

Easy job, I bought a timer and 12 guage wires. Red, Black, white and green. When I removed the wire from the current switch I used my stripper guage and it was in fact 12 guage. All is in conduit like it needs to be and all was completed in under 2 hours. I could have done it faster but took my time with everything as not to make a mistake and ensure the the timer box was hung level.

Thanks for all the feedback and assistance.

Doug
 
  #8  
Old 06-16-06, 08:05 PM
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Question Pondering My Job with a further question

Well everything is working well but I have a nagging question. The wire to the old switch and from the switch to the pump was braided 12 guage wire. What I used was solid 12 guage wire from the switch to the new timer, then the braided wire from the new timer to the pump. Will this create a problem? And if so can someone explain the reason for the differnce.

Thanks for setting my mind at ease or correcting an error. Either way I am grateful for this forum.

Thanks,

Doug
 
  #9  
Old 06-17-06, 07:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Money Pitt
The wire to the old switch and from the switch to the pump was braided 12 guage wire.

Doug
Do you mean "stranded"?

If so, then there is nothing to worry about. While some folks prefer solid (especially residential guys) and NM (romex) is only available in solid, many others prefer stranded because it's ease of installation. The two can be mixed without any problem.
 
  #10  
Old 06-17-06, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Money Pitt
And if so can someone explain the reason for the differnce.
Doug, the only difference is the actual makeup of the wire. Both are equal in the eyes of the code and what they are hooked up to.
You just have to make certain any terminations of stranded wire are very secure.

In conduit I use stranded wire almost exclusively.
 
  #11  
Old 06-17-06, 09:53 AM
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Thumbs up Thank you!!!

Thanks Speedy and Nap,

I assumed that they were compatiable but not being a certified electrician I wanted to speak to a pro or 2. And yes I meant stranded.

Thanks and Regards,

Doug
 
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