electric fan question


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Old 06-04-06, 07:13 PM
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Question electric fan question

OK why does a vintage metal box fan always give you an electric shock if you touch it when you in your bare feet? My hands are not wet and its not just this fan. Almost every vintage metal fan does this why? Are they not grounded properly or what? Just wondering. The new fans don't do it.
 
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Old 06-04-06, 07:16 PM
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I hate to ask you this question here but what kind of wiring you have ??

Romax or BX or AC or T&K [ tube and knob ] ??


any chance the box fan have 2 blade plug or 3 blade plug ??

i think what happend i think you may have mild current leakage from motor to the frame

try to reverse the two blade plug to see if that clear up if not then the chance is the fan motor or other wires is rubbing agaist the housing.

one possiblty that you may have a open ground but i dont have much info what you are saying here but need more details so we can help you in correct way

Merci , Marc


just correcting my own goof here [ i was tranalating wrong here sorry about that ]
 
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Old 06-04-06, 07:29 PM
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Well the garage were I run it most of the time Is romex (the white wire that goes from outlet to outlet. The fan as a 2 prong plug (the old kind that will go into a outlet bothways not like the new that only go in one way) If I touch the controll panel on the fan or a corner or the grill I get a Tingle in my hand(the kind you get if you touch a bare 110V wire my hand jerks away so thats good Im not holding onto it). If I were shoes or socks I don't get the feeling. Also the fan uses 2.4 AMPS 60 HZ 110 volts AC. Heres a picture of the fan in question.




Maby its not normal Or is it just because it sits on concret?
It does not do it in the house.
 

Last edited by lexmarks567; 06-05-06 at 12:45 AM.
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Old 06-05-06, 03:54 AM
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Throw the fan away. It is bad.
 
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Old 06-05-06, 03:59 AM
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HUH I guess its not normel than Ok. Trashdays this tuesday I will pitch it then.
 
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Old 06-05-06, 04:03 AM
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What you are experiencing is probably leakage current.

As motors get older, they sometimes develop leakage current. A common example is a refrigerator compressor. The leakage current is not enough to trip a circuit breaker, but is enough to trip a GFCI.

If the leakage current has a place to go then you usually never notice it. A refrigerator is a grounded appliance, so the current can return to the source via the ground wire. However, a fan with a two prong plug has no path for the current to return on. When you touch the fan, your body provides a path and your bare feet provide the connection to the concrete.

With small enough current values it's a light tingle. With larger current values it's death by electrocution.

Fan's are cheap.
 
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Old 06-05-06, 05:21 AM
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I have the same situation on a customer's pool lighting. It is about 10 years old and they had someone come in a "diagnose" a wiring problem. Lights surround the pool and there is an in pool light. Lights operate just fine, but I noticed they removed a GFCI and installed a regular receptacle. I removed the breaker and installed a GFCI breaker and it trips out. Works fine with regular breaker, though. Now, I've got to "re-diagnose" the leak, as I don't want them around the pool area even if it is just lighting. It's just billed as time, but I hate them having to pay for it twice.
So ANY leak is a bad leak. I agree, toss it.
 
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Old 06-05-06, 06:11 AM
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Yeah I will pitch it this tuesday I just collect old stuff.

Originally Posted by racraft
What you are experiencing is probably leakage current.

As motors get older, they sometimes develop leakage current. A common example is a refrigerator compressor. The leakage current is not enough to trip a circuit breaker, but is enough to trip a GFCI.

If the leakage current has a place to go then you usually never notice it. A refrigerator is a grounded appliance, so the current can return to the source via the ground wire. However, a fan with a two prong plug has no path for the current to return on. When you touch the fan, your body provides a path and your bare feet provide the connection to the concrete.

With small enough current values it's a light tingle. With larger current values it's death by electrocution.

Fan's are cheap.
 
 

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