Recessed light and junction box question


  #1  
Old 06-10-06, 07:57 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Recessed light and junction box question

I want to install a recessed light over my shower in my basement bathroom. This is similar to what I have http://www.doityourself.com/invt/6328892 My question is that after I hang this light and rock the ceiling I will not have access to the junction box since above it is the upstairs bathroom. Any recommendations on the correct fixture I should use would be greatly appreciated. Thanks,

John
 
  #2  
Old 06-10-06, 08:01 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,970
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If what you are stating were really true, you would not be allowed to install the light. However, your assertion is not correct.

Recessed lights have access to the junction box from below. When you remove a portion of the fixture, you can get to the box from the living space.
 
  #3  
Old 06-10-06, 08:10 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
racraft, that was fast and thank you. I was assuming the same about having access too, but looking at it I don't see how. Could you just explain how. Maybe I'm just looking at it in the wrong way. I have an Emerald Recessed Light
model# P401-TSW
Thanks,

John
 
  #4  
Old 06-10-06, 08:16 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I see now I have to remove the can from the hanger bracket and the junction box becomes accessible. Thanks for the help.
 
  #5  
Old 06-10-06, 08:18 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,970
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The junction box will have access panels (covers) on each side. Up inside the light there are screws that allow you to adjust the height of the socket. When you loosen and remove these screws and a portion of the housing you can access the backside of the junction box.
 
  #6  
Old 06-10-06, 01:35 PM
L
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,112
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You may NOT use the fixture you have featured in your shower. It must have sealed lense, and be weather resistant.
The fixture you showed is not suitable for your application.
Not even on ground fault protection.
 
  #7  
Old 06-10-06, 02:15 PM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,970
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
lectriclee,

On the Lowes web site this fixture is listed as approved for a shower. What information do you have that contradicts this?
 
  #8  
Old 06-10-06, 02:29 PM
L
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,112
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
In my years of service I have not seen a fixture with the lamp exposed ever accepted on inspection in a shower application (over spas/hot tubs, yes, meeting hight requirements), It must have a lense over it to keep moisture out.
I did not research this product. Is it suitable for wet locations? If so I suppose it can be used.

My answer was based on personal experience with the inspectors.
I've been wrong before.
 
  #9  
Old 06-10-06, 03:43 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hello, lectriclee
The box says:
Damp location listed
UL Listed for wet location-For covered ceiling installation only.

The lense cover has a gasket around it also.

The light is hung, wired and working. I just forgot one thing , to run it off a GFCI outlet. So right now I'm enjoying a cold beer then I'm off to install a GFCI to run the light off of.

One quick question though, the fixture is not centered between the joist. I'm about 2" away from the joist on one side. The lamp is thermally protected. Do you see this being a problem? Thanks,

John
 
  #10  
Old 06-10-06, 05:27 PM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,749
Received 187 Votes on 167 Posts
My understanding is this:

The can itself, can be used in a shower if and only if used with a sealed trim ring. The photo you have attached shows it with an eyeball ring. This type, or the trim ring you would usually find in a kitchen or other setting, is not approved for a shower. But as long as you have the "shower" sealed trim ring, you should be all set.

Additionally, from other posts around here, I learned that a shower recessed light does NOT need to be GFCI protected. One reason is if the GFCI receptacle trips, you don't want to be in the dark standing in a slippery shower. Plus, with an appropriate trim ring, there shouldn't be a need for GFCI protection.

Of course, someone will correct me if I've been led astray.

-Mike
 
  #11  
Old 06-10-06, 07:23 PM
L
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,112
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Zorfdt
My understanding is this:

The can itself, can be used in a shower if and only if used with a sealed trim ring. The photo you have attached shows it with an eyeball ring. This type, or the trim ring you would usually find in a kitchen or other setting, is not approved for a shower. But as long as you have the "shower" sealed trim ring, you should be all set.

Additionally, from other posts around here, I learned that a shower recessed light does NOT need to be GFCI protected. One reason is if the GFCI receptacle trips, you don't want to be in the dark standing in a slippery shower. Plus, with an appropriate trim ring, there shouldn't be a need for GFCI protection.

Of course, someone will correct me if I've been led astray.

-Mike
Now That was part of my original point..... The "trim" is sealed but the fixture itself is not. I've been called on this, and that was the premis of my first responce.
I also understand that a fixture over water, More than 7'6" does not have to be GFI protected. However I feel this to have nothing to do with anything due to the fact the switch may be located anywhere (food for thought), and a slight demonstration of how the code is conflicted. (as is any legal document).
 
  #12  
Old 06-10-06, 07:40 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Guys thanks. The link I posted was not the exact light I have. I was using it to show how the junction box sits and I couldn't figure out how to access it after the rock was up. But then I figured it out.

So I don't need to run the light off of a GFCI? How about the distance between the joist that I mentioned in my last post?

Thanks,

John
 
  #13  
Old 06-10-06, 07:51 PM
L
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,112
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Placement near or at the joist should not be an issue. If the ceiling is insulated then you must have an "IC" (insulation contact) rated fixture.
 
  #14  
Old 06-11-06, 06:27 AM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Just outside of Phila
Posts: 350
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
No insulation
Thanks for the help

John
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: