Couldn't restore power to the bathroom

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  #1  
Old 06-13-06, 06:11 PM
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Question Couldn't restore power to the bathroom

I thought I had succesfully rewired a new whirlpool bathtub, outlet and light fixture but something went wrong. The handy man who installed my tub seemed to do a fine job but admitted he is not an electrician. Anyway, he wired a hidden GFCI outlet for the new tub, a regular outlet and a light switch--even though the light fixture had yet to be installed. The tub worked fine and the outlet which is in the same remodel box as the light switch worked fine. I proceeded to install the fixture but it wasn't working. At this point I removed the cover housing the light switch and outlet. It was tough to see exactly how he wired the light fixture and switch, a regular outlet and a hidden GFCI outlet for the tub (acessible only when the tub's apron is removed. Regardless, the light switch wasn't working, so I took everything apart and started over. I thought I had it perfect, and when I turned the power back on I suddenly had light! Before I checked the GFCI outlet for th tub and the wall outlet for power, I walked to the light switch, turned it off and then on again...I lost power throughout the house! I turned all the breakers off and on again restoring power to everything except I have no power coming into the bathroom and as well as no power in a few outlets and switches in rooms adjacent to the bathroom. However, on the very same circuit as the bathroom are a few switches and outlets on the the floor below and in the basement; they are working fine. Would you please give me a gameplan on how to solve this problem? I need to restore power to the bathroom and the adjacent rooms. Help
 
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  #2  
Old 06-13-06, 07:03 PM
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I suggest you call an electrician. Your bathroom is not wired to code and cannot be until and unless run at least one new circuit. Since this is a remodel of significant proportions, you MUST bring the bathroom up to code.

Essentially, the bathroom must be completely on it's own circuits, or just the receptacles must be on their own circuit.
 
  #3  
Old 06-13-06, 10:34 PM
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#1) If you are going to be harmed, HARM yourself !
(nothing worse than paying someone to hurt you.)
This "handyman" is apparently limited on his/her handienes.
You get what you pay for and there is no rewind in life.

This feild is not "rocket science", BUT there is a great deal of knowledge to be had to do it correctly.

And personaly, I am seeing alot of HORROR storries here, and am afraid that some people may not be here to post back on how their project came out !!!!

Do the research, check your contractors credentials.
Check references.

A Licsensed and trained Pro ( any discipline) Is your best gamble.


PS: There are some projects that can be done by a "do it yourselfer", With proper guidence thru this site, and some that should not.
I would put the pool,spa, hot tub etc. in the later catigory. These items are not to be fooled with, They can be lethal with the slightest mistake.
 

Last edited by lectriclee; 06-13-06 at 10:50 PM.
  #4  
Old 06-14-06, 02:58 PM
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The handy man who installed my tub seemed to do a fine job but admitted he is not an electrician. Anyway, he wired a hidden GFCI outlet
If this guy told you he was not an electrician why did you let him do the wiring. This is illegal in most states. and an unsafe practice.

Sorry to be such a pooper, but you should turn this guy into the county inspection department and hire someone who is licenced to do wiring.
 
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Old 06-14-06, 06:16 PM
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While we are on this hidden GFCI thing...would it be okay to hide a gfci as one would 'hide' an outlet under the kitchen sink cabinet, IF, the gfci was at the end of the line and had no load wires attached? Just for curiosity sake?
 
  #6  
Old 06-14-06, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by DaVeBoy
While we are on this hidden GFCI thing...would it be okay to hide a gfci as one would 'hide' an outlet under the kitchen sink cabinet, IF, the gfci was at the end of the line and had no load wires attached? Just for curiosity sake?
Sure, you can hide it. As long as it is accessable.
Most hot tubs etc. have them behind an access panel.
 
  #7  
Old 06-14-06, 08:27 PM
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Careful. While You can place a GFCI receptacle under a kitchen sink, it cannot be on the same circuit as the counter top receptacles.
 
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Old 06-14-06, 08:36 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft
Careful. While You can place a GFCI receptacle under a kitchen sink, it cannot be on the same circuit as the counter top receptacles.

Correct, I should have stated as you noted.

small appliance ckts are for that ONLY. General purpose must be seperate.
 
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