My House Burned Due To Electrical Fire - Any Thoughts?

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  #1  
Old 07-03-06, 08:08 AM
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My House Burned Due To Electrical Fire - Any Thoughts?

My house had a small electrical fire and extensive electrical system damage on 6/22/06. My purpose here is to try and see if any of you have come across anything like this.

To tell you everything I know (about the fire) would take up 20 pages so I'll be a brief as possible.

Here is what I have:
1. Romex from breaker panel to furnace burned so badly that it caught fire and the switch on the furnace melted to a pool of plastic and metal.

2. Fridge cord burned to a crisp, but Romex feeding the outlet in good shape.

3. So far no damage to appliances (except fridge & oven) or TVs.

4. Electricians noting that neutral wires burned first....hot burned secondary as result of neutral wires burning.

5. Firemen & power company reading 56 volts to ground/neutral with the meter pulled!

Any thoughts on any of this? The burning furnace wire took out just about every wire coming out of the breaker panel.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-03-06, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by XS6DFG0
My house had a small electrical fire and extensive electrical system damage on 6/22/06. My purpose here is to try and see if any of you have come across anything like this.
I'm sorry to hear that, and I hope no one was injured.

Electricians noting that neutral wires burned first....hot burned secondary as result of neutral wires burning.
For some reason, this is usually how it goes. I honestly don't know why, but the neutral always seems to go bad before the hots.

Firemen & power company reading 56 volts to ground/neutral with the meter pulled!
Without knowing their test procedure, this measurement doesn't mean much. I hope they knew how to use the meter properly and this isn't a phantom voltage measurement. Assuming so, you may have had power feeding back from a neighbor's house through the copper water distribution pipes. That could wreak all sorts of havoc on your electrical system. However without knowing more details, that's a long shot.

Any thoughts on any of this? The burning furnace wire took out just about every wire coming out of the breaker panel.
It happens sometimes, sorry it had to happen to you. Did you have aluminum wire? What brand of electrical panel did you have? Had you noticed any symptoms before the fire? Flickering lights (dimming or especially brightening), burning/hot smells, popping sounds, anything like that? I assume the air conditioner was running; were there any problem with that?
 
  #3  
Old 07-03-06, 10:07 AM
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Additional Info:

1. There was no primary ground (which I didn't know.....darn home inspector). The house was originally well water but when public water came down the street they never attached a ground wire from the panel to the incoming water pipe. I had a secondary ground rod though. I realize this probably would not have happened if I had a primary ground in place, but this still doesn't change the fact that something happened.

2. I had no aluminum wiring. GE Panel in 20 year old house.

3. Fire Department, substation guys, and bucket truck guys, using three different meters, found 56 volts coming into the house with the meter pulled.

4. There are two utility poles that I have questions about. The first pole is in front of my house and there is another pole in front of my neighbor. Both poles have a transformer on them. Due to the way my house is situated, the transformer in front of my house serves only me. The transformer in front of my neighbor's house serves him and a few houses around him. The breaker on my transformer never tripped during this entire surge/fire. My neighbor's transformer did have a breaker trip. When that breaker tripped, we lost voltage coming into my house. When the power company reset the breaker on my neighbor's tranformer, we got voltage coming back into my house with the meter pulled!
 
  #4  
Old 07-03-06, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by XS6DFG0
Additional Info:
3. Fire Department, substation guys, and bucket truck guys, using three different meters, found 56 volts coming into the house with the meter pulled.
What surprises me is that out of all those seemingly qualified personnel, none of them found it curious enough to stick around and determine a cause.
 
  #5  
Old 07-03-06, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by mdtaylor
What surprises me is that out of all those seemingly qualified personnel, none of them found it curious enough to stick around and determine a cause.
The fire department left after the gas meter was shut off, electrical meter was pulled, and fire was put out. Obviously the fire was electrical in nature so they left. The assistant fire chief stayed behind to relay the information to the power company.

The power company had no bucket truck guys available and sent out a couple of reps from the substation. The substation guys listened to what the fire chief said and then took some readings of their own. When they determined that there was indeed 56 volts coming from bare wire (ground) down from the pole, they decided to escalate the call.

When The bucket truck crew (4 guys in two trucks) showed up, they listened to what the chief said and what the substation guys said and took a voltage reading. Guess what it read.......zero volts! The bucket truck guy said it wasn't their problem and that something in my house caused this. The fire chief grabbed that bucket truck guy by the collar and asked him why two different meters showed voltage. The bucket truck guys pulled the lines down from the transformer and inspected them and they were OK. They tested the voltage again and it still showed nothing. They were about to leave when a man walked up the street and said he recently lost power. They went around the corner and found several houses to be without power. They saw that a transformer's (not my house's transformer, but the one next door) breaker had been tripped. They reset the breaker on that transformer and all houses (except mine, obviously) lit back up. The chief took his meter out and tested the voltage to my house again and it read 56 volts. He told the bucket truck guy to come over and the bucket truck guy used his own meter and found the same thing. This means that my house was receiving voltage based on whether or not a transformer (not mine) was operational or not. You should have seen the look on that guys face when he saw the voltage on there. That was at 11:00 PM and to be honest I was dog-tired after watching my house catch fire. Since the power company is not allowed in my house anyway, I left. I don't know what they ever found.

I just want to know if any of you guys have ever seen anything like this.

I have a very reputable group of electricians rewiring my home and each one, including the owner of the company, says this is not a lightning strike. They have kicked around terms such as "power surge" and "power company losing their neutral leg".

Any thoughts?
 
  #6  
Old 07-03-06, 09:32 PM
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I just want to know if any of you guys have ever seen anything like this.

I have a very reputable group of electricians rewiring my home and each one, including the owner of the company, says this is not a lightning strike. They have kicked around terms such as "power surge" and "power company losing their neutral leg".#

Very sorry to hear of your loss.

It seems to be a combination of failures.
Your home was not properly grounded/bonded (stated you went from well to city water) Your ground/bond is a back up to the power co.
Their system aswell appears to not have been properly bonded,or to have a bad ground/bond.
This in combination with a surge or a loose neutral ,in or out of your home could cause such an imbalance to heat things up.

Whereas you stated that when they reset the neighbors x-former you got voltage. Implies their grounds/bonds are not good.

NEIGHBORS beware!!!!!!!!! Now I'm sure their (poco) on it.

Just like dealing with doctors.. KEEP ASKING untill you understand.

Best wishes.
 
  #7  
Old 07-04-06, 06:38 PM
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Across what points were they measuring 56 volts. The two hot wires are open with the meter pulled so the source of voltage must be the neutral. IF there is voltage beween the neutral and ground then the ground and neutral are not bonded together. If you are reeading voltage on the hot wires then it is probably feeding through things still on the circuit, Lights and so forth.
 
  #8  
Old 07-04-06, 10:01 PM
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Check out the voltage mentioned in this message from a thread at Mike Holt. Probably just a coincidence.

But a search on Stray Voltage over there may give you some reading material.

http://www.mikeholt.com/codeforum/ul...=007287#000012

"
hurk27
...
posted June 29, 2005 02:33 AM

electrolysis damage can happen with AC or DC current, We had a apartment building with a loss primary neutral that caused the exposed concentric neutral to first dissolve then the water pipe started getting leaks so plumbers replaced it with plastic then the rod electrodes finely dissolved enough that there was 56 volts on all the grounding in and around the building including the POCO's pad mounted transformer. [Eek!] We were finely called when basement floor tenets were getting shocks off the shower handles while standing on tile over concrete floors, I say all of this to say one point, Find the cause of the current!!!

If the last of the ground rods were to completely dissolve there could have been the full primary voltage (7200v in this case) placed upon all the grounding and everything connected to it. So think about this when disconnecting a EGC with current on it, It might be your last!

--------------------
Wayne A. From: N.W.Indiana
Be Fair, Be Safe
Just don't be fairly safe
"
 
  #9  
Old 07-05-06, 05:59 AM
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Originally Posted by JimmieDee
Across what points were they measuring 56 volts. The two hot wires are open with the meter pulled so the source of voltage must be the neutral. IF there is voltage beween the neutral and ground then the ground and neutral are not bonded together. If you are reeading voltage on the hot wires then it is probably feeding through things still on the circuit, Lights and so forth.
I'm not sure which points they were reading at. I believe they were checking inside the meter box. The meter was sitting on the ground since the time the firemen pulled it.
 
  #10  
Old 07-05-06, 06:32 AM
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Just some more information and an interesting theory.

The original reason me and my family left the house was due to a gas leak.

It seems that there was a hole blown in the flexible gas connector behind the oven.

The overwhelming theory is this:
The surge came into the house looking for ground. It chose the furnace wire (central A/C was running at the time). The surge passed through the furnace wire, melting & burning it. The surge went through the furnace and into the gas line connected to it and used the gas lines of the house as a ground. The gas lines of the house started to heat up. The gas line behind the oven got so hot that it melted through the oven's electric cord that was resting against it. The oven's cord shorted and blew a hole though the flexible gas connector, causing a major leak.

Does this sound plausible? Could 56 volts continuous for around 2 to 3 hours heat up gas lines enough to burn a hand?

When the first fireman came in to shut off the gas behind the oven........he couldn't. He burned his hand on the gas shut off valve behind the oven.........so I know the gas lines were hot (temp-wise).

BTW - power was restored on 7/3/2006. The electricians had to rewire much of the house. They put in a new service, new load center, two new ground rods, grounded the service to the incoming public water line, surge suppressor, and lightning arrestor.

They said it should never happen again, but I still worry about what did happen out on that pole.
 
  #11  
Old 07-05-06, 12:56 PM
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So I was reading through it, then started skimming because there is so much garbage info and useless info, that no good info is present to tell you anything, and all of a sudden every one is electrical expert.

As for assuming 56Volts for a few hours, if you were home you would have seen the lights be dim. Also an under voltage isn't going to cause electrical appliances such as a stove to catch fire if the wiring was not faulty in them. I am wondering why no breakers flipped.

And how electricity assuming that caused the pipe to heat up without causing a breaker to flip brings suspicion to the wiring in your house or something that failed.

The electricity shouldn't be flowing through the gas piping to begin with so you having 56v shouldn't cause them to heat up if your house had no wiring problems. it would take a considerable amount of current to heat a gas pipe to the point to melt a wire. (the current would trip the breaker assuming it was wired right and everything was functional)


Need to know how they are measuring as stated way above would be helpful.

If they did nothing out on the pole and everything is fine now I would question the components at the box and would send the old parts to a lab for testing if it is that big of a deal to you

as for electrolysis did they replace the grounding rod. There is no such thing as phantom voltage.

From what I read the power surge could have came from stuff shorting out in your house, and then feeding back to your neighbors blowing their properly working electrical system breakers or what ever breakers see it first.

A short in the right place would explain your burned neutrals to and why your neighbors were fine.

Also I am going to assume they took a measurement from one of the phases to your house to "ground". If the "neutral/ground" is burned or has a higher resistance from after being burned or damaged. The meter will not be referencing to ground because there will be a load between it and ground and you will be measuring from a different ground reference; cuz of the new load.

I use quotations around ground because that is a term used referencing 0 volts with respect to our normally interacted environment as humans

I would say failure of parts in breakerbox the worse kind of failure you can have because depending how it failed all you have is what the power company has to stop the power to your house, which in the mean time will allow a huge amount of current to your house till their stuff trips, usually its till the what ever burns open to stop current flow.

Poor grounding of the house will induce larger currents on the neutral which can be bad like you have found out.

I would say sue the home inspectors they are supposed to catch things that are not properly done to stop things like this from happening. And yes all your improper grounding can escalate the severity of electrical failure problems
 

Last edited by hotrodder89; 07-05-06 at 01:36 PM.
  #12  
Old 07-06-06, 05:41 AM
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Originally Posted by hotrodder89
Poor guy getting grabbed I would have knocked out that firemen and busted his nose if he grabbed me by the collar, that is uncalled for.
That is easy to say because it wasn't your house that burned.

The bucket truck guy found no voltage and said "Oh well, it isn't our problem".

The fireman told the guy he found voltage. The substation guys told the guy he found voltage. The bucket truck guy suggested that they should learn to take a reading. That was when the fireman grabbed the guy.

If the fireman had not have done that, The problem might not have been fixed. What we had here was a poco guy that either didn't feel like doing a thorough job or didn't want the power company to be liable for burning my house.
 
  #13  
Old 07-06-06, 06:44 AM
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Let's stop the non-productive comments.
 
  #14  
Old 07-06-06, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by hotrodder89
If they did nothing out on the pole and everything is fine now I would question the components at the box and would send the old parts to a lab for testing if it is that big of a deal to you
Of course it is a big deal to me. I have $40,000 worth of damages on my house, not to mention the fact that we could have been killed.

If the problem came from within my house..........fine, I can accept that. My insurance will cover it and I might even sue the home inspector. The problem is that I have 4 electricians telling me that the poco probably fried my house! I'm not sure what to do.

Besides, they (poco) did something on the pole that night. At 11:00 pm, when I went home, they were reading 56 volts to ground. My meter had been pulled for over 4 hours. The fire was out and the house was completely dead. When the main poco guy discovered the voltage (after the neighbor's transformer was turned back on) he was amazed. I asked him if he needed into my house and he said he wasn't allowed in my house. He then said they were going to be there for a while to straighten things out. I was tired and left the scene. When the electricians showed up the next day.......they read 0 volts.
 
  #15  
Old 07-06-06, 07:08 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft
Let's stop the non-productive comments.
I agree.

I'm looking for help here.

After you hear about a dozen people say that they have never seen anything like this..........you have to start asking other people who may have experienced it.

I'm not blaming the poco.........I'm trying to gather input.
 
  #16  
Old 07-06-06, 07:12 AM
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I am sure if I were a substation guy I could find a votage reading somewhere to. There is no way to help without you noting it as it happened, because if you ask them now they may tell you different than what they did.

I really don't care if it was your house that burned or mine, You need the facts from everything you have stated above that happened the problem looked to have come from in your house.
 
  #17  
Old 07-06-06, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by XS6DFG0
I'm looking for help here.
Have you spoken with a lawyer? Have you supplied the information from the electricians to your insurance company?
 
  #18  
Old 07-06-06, 07:27 AM
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exactly what hes says.

You have been noted by a licensed electrician the house had improper grounding (and passed inspection), whether or not there was a code for that when it was built (or inspected) is another story.

Like I said improper grounding can dramatically escalate the damage produced from power failures. Any engineer will agree with that. A lot of safety devices rely on the ground being done properly to function. It can even make the difference between life and deaf, God rest the soul of a class mate who had an improperly grounded power tool at home that had acquired an internal short to the case. If it had proper grounding he would more than likely still be alive, guess he learned hard way that the 3 prong to 2 prong adapter is a dumb thing to use.

Also the lawyer is going to need everything in detail to. Even more than just us asking where the measurements were made.
 
  #19  
Old 07-06-06, 07:41 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft
Have you spoken with a lawyer? Have you supplied the information from the electricians to your insurance company?
I have not talked to a lawyer yet as my insurance company has been helping me and paying to put my house back together.

The electricians have been kind and offered to testify on my behalf if needed if this goes to court. After speaking with his electricians, the owner of the company came out to personally inspect the damage and the repair. He offered to testify on my behalf as well.

The county electrical inspector came out twice and took pictures and said the same darn thing my electricians are saying.

Everyone has said the same thing......this probably would not have happened had your house been properly grounded........but then right after they say that they say, "but something happened to cause it" and they all imply the poco.

When I told my insurance adjuster about their findings he just rolled his eyes and says you can't prove fault with a utility company. I even had the electricans explain it to him and bring him through the house. He says you just can't win with them.
 
  #20  
Old 07-06-06, 07:42 AM
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dude if you got power surged your neighbors would have to, to.

But since you had improper grounding your house would start on fire and your neighbors wouldn't.

But if your fuse panel failed you would have produced the transient that killed everyone elses breakers.

Your problem is you want to point blame on the power company(and we can't say its their fault), and you want us to not say that is was because of improper installation or wiring in your house.
 
  #21  
Old 07-06-06, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by hotrodder89
dude if you got power surged your neighbors would have to, to.

But since you had improper grounding your house would start on fire and your neighbors wouldn't.

But if your fuse panel failed you would have produced the transient that killed everyone elses breakers.

Your problem is you want to point blame on the power company(and we can't say its their fault), and you want us to not say that is was because of improper installation or wiring in your house.
Dude, I don't want you guys to say it was the poco's fault. I want your opinion as guys who may have seen this before. I have already told you I'm not out to pin the poco. I just wanted to know if you guys had ever seen anything like this.

Why are you so belligerent when someone is looking for help? From the first time you commented, you have not really provided anything other than an angry tone. You are not carefully reading what I wrote.

There were no breakers tripped in my neighbor's home.

The only breaker that tripped in this whole mess, was a transformer's breaker down the street (not mine, my transformer never lost power). I have spoke with three neighbors since that night and none had a breaker trip. They lost power when their transformer's breaker tripped. That breaker tripped towards the end of the night, 45 minutes to an hour after the fire department had left my house! My house was completely dead, with a pulled meter for three hours when that transformer's breaker tripped.
 
  #22  
Old 07-06-06, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by XS6DFG0
2. Fridge cord burned to a crisp, but Romex feeding the outlet in good shape.

3. So far no damage to appliances (except fridge & oven) or TV
If you change the cord on the fridge will it work ?

whats wrong with the oven ?

How close was the cord to you gas pipe or oven ?

Was any wires to your oven damaged ?

Did the gas catch fire ?
How big was the hole in the gas line ?
How old was the gas line?

How close is the furnace to the oven ?

How old is your fridge ?

I'm trying to find out why your fridge's cord got damaged.
 
  #23  
Old 07-06-06, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by GWIZ
I'm trying to find out why your fridge's cord got damaged.
?????????????

It got damaged because it got shorted out and surged when the components in the fuse/breaker box gave, and since it was not properly grounded the power went else where other than ground where it should have gone.

Its to bad it all got replaced so fast so a proper investigation could not be done for the exact point of failure.
 
  #24  
Old 07-06-06, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by GWIZ
If you change the cord on the fridge will it work ?
I'm not sure. I would like to know the answer to that, but I probably never will. Best Buy is delivering a new fridge tomorrow and taking the old one.

Originally Posted by GWIZ
whats wrong with the oven ?
The power cord is damaged (melted where it was touching the flexible gas line). Again, if you replaced the power cord, it might or might not work. Best Buy is also delivering a new oven tomorrow and taking the old one.

Originally Posted by GWIZ
How close was the cord to you gas pipe or oven ?
The cord was probably resting on or against the flexible gas line. When you plug the oven in and rest it against the flexible gas line, the burned spot on the wire and hole in the gas line meet up perfectly.

Originally Posted by GWIZ
Was any wires to your oven damaged ?
Just the cord as we can all see. If you mean electronics within the oven........that is unknown.

Originally Posted by GWIZ
Did the gas catch fire ?
No. The fireman explained that that rarely happens. After I heard a pop or ping.........the gas just started spewing out.

Originally Posted by GWIZ
How big was the hole in the gas line ?
I would say around and 1/8 of an inch.

Originally Posted by GWIZ
How old was the gas line?
Unknown. The oven was part of the house when we purchased it. I know the oven is less than 7 years old (probably closer to 3 or 4 years old). I would like to think that the flexible line was replaced at that time.

Originally Posted by GWIZ
How close is the furnace to the oven ?
The furnace is in the basement and the fridge is directly over the furnace. The oven would be just to the left of the fridge (separated by a 12 inch cabinet).

Originally Posted by GWIZ
How old is your fridge ?
The one that burned is less than 4 years old. I also have a 10 year old fridge in the garage that was not affected.
 
  #25  
Old 07-09-06, 12:40 AM
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Originally Posted by XS6DFG0

5. Firemen & power company reading 56 volts to ground/neutral with the meter pulled!
In your case meter pulled, no water pipe grounding.
Depending on what points you are checking, water pipe to neutral it is possible to get a voltage reading.

Most homes are all tied to water pipes and the neutral line is connected to the water pipes.(only at the main panel)
===
Say a group of homes powered from the same transformer.

Lets say the power goes down thru the hot line from the pole thru whatever is being used in the home, then it goes thru the neutral line back up the pole.

Now wait a minute ! .
At the main service panel the neutral line connects to a water pipe, the conductive water pipes connect all the homes together and the neutral lines.
That makes all the homes neutral lines running in parallel connected by water pipes.
Say your using 100 amps measured on the hot line. if you measure the neutral line it will be less, because a percentage will also flow thru the water pipes to the other homes, back up thru the other neutral lines.

The amount of current flowing thru each parallel line depends on the resistance of the lines.
I read some were the current flowing thru the water pipes is an average of 5%

Look at it as if you add a second garden hose on the same faucet. you will have water flowing thru both hoses at a divided rate, depending on the size or resistance of each hose.

I cant say how your house if affected, because your on a separate transformer maybe they bonded your neutral line to the other homes.

If you cut the power to the other homes you also stop the current and voltage flowing thru the water pipes. as in your case no more voltage readings when the breaker tripped on the other transformer.
 
  #26  
Old 07-09-06, 10:09 PM
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I beleive you lost a neutral. And they didn't have a ground for you. Their problem, now it's yours. That stinks!!!!!!
Lawyers will help (themselves), but the utilities (as with any form of government) are not liable ( and will help themselves, as well).That REALY REALY STINKS (edited)!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
  #27  
Old 07-10-06, 05:26 AM
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Originally Posted by GWIZ
In your case meter pulled, no water pipe grounding.
Depending on what points you are checking, water pipe to neutral it is possible to get a voltage reading.
I'm sorry I can't say exactly what points they were testing.

All I can say is that the readings were taken outside of my house. It was dark and I have shrubs around my service entrance. There were about 6 or 7 guys standing around and I really couldn't see. My meter was pulled at that point so I'm guessing they had access to the inside of my meter socket and the copper wire leading out of the house to my ground rod.
 
  #28  
Old 07-10-06, 11:38 AM
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I think what happened here is this:

Your house was providing a small, but significant current to the other homes, through your transformer, then the service panel, down through the water pipes. Your neighbors homes were pulling from their transformer as well as yours. I am not sure where the fault in the connection occured that made your transformer start feeding the neighbors. This hypothesis would explain why when your house went offline (burnt and was disconnected) there was a significant load put on the neighbors' transformer causing it to blow the fuse.

The only way I can see you would have power to your box after meter disconnect is if the transformers were sharing a connection, such as the neutral and the power was coming through the ground (earth, water pipe) to your home.

This is all just speculation, but I cannot see any other reason as to why your neighbors' transformer tripped unless the two were somehow connected. Furthermore, if they were connected, it would give some explanation as to why 56v showed up on your line with the fuse intact, and no voltage with the fuse blown.

I would venture to guess when the poco stayed and fixed the connection that night, they fixed the issue that was causing all of this. Bad ground, severed ground, whatever it was.
 
  #29  
Old 07-10-06, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Heterman

Your house was providing a small, but significant current to the other homes, through your transformer, then the service panel, down through the water pipes.
House does a house generate a current when it has no generator?

I read this thread a while ago and it was explained over thouroghly. For some reason the admins took the information out becuase it was helpful as is the point of the forum. But the tone change to annoyed in the responses because of the replies to it.

For gods sakes just lock this thread so it can go dead, it was beat to death once we don't need it to happen again.
 
  #30  
Old 07-10-06, 01:35 PM
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Here is the timeline of events if it helps anyone. Thanks for all the information everyone.

06:45 pm - Gas line ruptures.
06:52 pm - Fire Department arrives and shuts gas off at meter
07:05 pm - Insulation behind furnace catches fire, due to furnace electrical line burning.
07:06 pm - Fire Department shuts off all breakers including main.
07:10 pm - Fire Department decides to pull electrical meter.
07:15 pm - Fire Department controlling fires with foam....Chief tells me of the situation (56 volts to ground, as he stated).
08:00 pm - Fires out.
08:30 pm - Substation guys from poco show up and confirm 56 volts to ground and determine resolution is beyond them.
09:00 pm - Fire Department leaves.
09:45 pm - Approximate time neighbor's transformer tripped based on what the neighbor said.
09:50 pm - Two bucket trucks from poco show up and read no voltage.
10:20 pm - Poco pulled and inspected lines to house - no problems.
10:40 pm - Neighbor walks up to a poco employee and complains of no power.
10:50 pm - Poco resets neighbor's transformer (breaker). Power restored to neighbors.
10:55 pm - Poco bucket truck guys confirm voltage.
11:00 pm - Me and the fire chief leave.
 
  #31  
Old 07-11-06, 06:51 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 46
Originally Posted by snuckers99
House does a house generate a current when it has no generator?

I read this thread a while ago and it was explained over thouroghly. For some reason the admins took the information out becuase it was helpful as is the point of the forum. But the tone change to annoyed in the responses because of the replies to it.

For gods sakes just lock this thread so it can go dead, it was beat to death once we don't need it to happen again.
I didn't mean his house was generating a current. I meant a current was feeding through his home to the others before the house burnt, before any of this happened. When his meter went offline, he was no longer feeding that (needed) current to the neighbors and their transformer or fuse blew because of an overload on thier transformer.

Simply what I was suggesting was there was current flowing back and forth to the homes in the neighborhood. How else would he have 56v on his home wiring after the meter was pulled? It was coming from the other transformer, the neighbors'. Like you said, his house wasn't generating power, was it?

This was probably all due to a poco ground/neutral issue that never showed up until this guy's house unfortunately burned.
 
  #32  
Old 07-12-06, 09:29 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: North Virginia
Posts: 192
Originally Posted by Heterman
I didn't mean his house was generating a current. I meant a current was feeding through his home to the others before the house burnt, before any of this happened. When his meter went offline, he was no longer feeding that (needed) current to the neighbors and their transformer or fuse blew because of an overload on thier transformer.
So instead of the return currents that everybody else is talking about, you are saying the poco SUPPLIED current to the neighborhood through his house/meter and that he was actually paying for a portion of his neighbor's power usage on his bill?
 
  #33  
Old 07-12-06, 11:43 AM
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Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 257
Originally Posted by Heterman
I meant a current was feeding through his home to the others before the house burnt, before any of this happened. When his meter went offline, he was no longer feeding that (needed) current to the neighbors and their transformer or fuse blew because of an overload on thier transformer.
Several electricians who were on site, including the county electrical inspector, made similar statements.

I am not an electrical expert so I asked him to explain that to me in simple terms. He explained that it was like my neighbor's power demands were coming through my house and cooking my wires.

To be honest the entire thing is confusing to me.
 
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