GFCI outlet wiring help

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Old 07-03-06, 03:24 PM
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GFCI outlet wiring help

I just moved into a 1978 built house and installed a GFCI outlet in a box that does not have a grounding wire. I assume that the metal casing around the wire acts as a ground??? In any case I have not attached a ground wire to the GFCI outlet and it does not discontinue power when I push the test button. If I attach a wire to the outlet and then somewhere on the box, will this ground the system allowing the GFCI to work properly?
 
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Old 07-03-06, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by JOEYRM
I just moved into a 1978 built house and installed a GFCI outlet in a box that does not have a grounding wire. I assume that the metal casing around the wire acts as a ground??? In any case I have not attached a ground wire to the GFCI outlet and it does not discontinue power when I push the test button. If I attach a wire to the outlet and then somewhere on the box, will this ground the system allowing the GFCI to work properly?
Metal casing around the wire??
Can you explain this a bit?

Can you tell if the wire is romex (NM)? It would have 2 or 3 conductors wrapped with an outer shield of plastic. The older style was silver or black and had a cloth like wrapping.

or do possibly have conduit (metal pipe) coming into a metal box??


Anyway, the GFCI will work without a ground. It compares the current flow on the white and black (or other color) wires and when they are imbalanced, the GFCI trips.

On GFCI's there are two sets of screw. One is marked line and the other load. Which set did you use?
 
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Old 07-03-06, 04:17 PM
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If your house was built in 1978 it has grounded wiring.
I assume you have AC (BX) wiring from the description you gave.

If this is the case you can just run a tail from the box to the device.

Only thing is if this is a metal box, as it should be, the GFI would have been grounded enough for the to test to work. I am with NAP and think you wired it wrong. Newer GFI devices will not trip if wired incorrectly.
 
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Old 07-03-06, 06:32 PM
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Did you conect the wires to the LINE terminals of the GFCI? Newer GFCIs won't work if you get the wires backwards, but older ones will, they just won't work properly.
 
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Old 07-03-06, 07:38 PM
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The cable is BX. I ran the live powered wires as directed and the next outlet onto load. I did not however ground the GFCI to the box. I will try that in the morning and hope for the best. Thanks for the responses.
 
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Old 07-03-06, 07:54 PM
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I just moved into a 1978 built house and installed a GFCI outlet in a box that does not have a grounding wire. I assume that the metal casing around the wire acts as a ground??? In any case I have not attached a ground wire to the GFCI outlet and it does not discontinue power when I push the test button. If I attach a wire to the outlet and then somewhere on the box, will this ground the system allowing the GFCI to work [email protected]@@@


It appears you have "LINE"/"LOAD" reversed. This can be VERY "counter productive" (PC- which is BS) USELESS, is more appropriate. Double check it and get it correct.
You may have to make the initial check with the power on. PLEASE be carefull!!!!!!!!!!
 
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