Subpanel location

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  #1  
Old 07-06-06, 07:13 PM
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Subpanel location

I'm looking for advice on wiring my shop. I have just upgraded my home from an old 60 amp fuse box to a 200 amp panel. I would now like to add a 100 amp subpanel to my shop. To start this, I have run 1.5" pvc from the house. My question is this: my pvc runs up my shop wall in a place that I cannot put a subpanel, so I need to run wire over a doorway and across about 2 stud spaces. What is the best/safest way to do this? It will not be inspected, but I want to follow as close to code as possible. Also, what sizes wire should I use to run this service (al since cu is so expensive right now)? It is residential, and my run is about 40 feet (probably between 40 and 50 feet of actual wire with movement inside the shop and tying into main panel).

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 07-07-06, 03:15 PM
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It's hard to say without seeing a picture. A rule to keep in mind when running conduit is that code allows no more than 360 degrees of bends between pull points. From a practical standpoint you'll want no more than about 270 degrees of bends between pulls or you may not be able to pull the conductors by hand. Also, pull points should be accessible and not covered with sheetrock. If you install a pull box or "L" type conduit body, be sure to keep it accessible.

Perhaps you could use the current location for a disconnect switch and install another run of conduit from the current location to the subpanel. You could then use a main lug only (MLO) panel without a main breaker.

For a 100A subpanel, you should run #2-2-2-6 aluminum for hot-hot-neutral-ground respectively. Be sure the conductors you purchase are rated for use in wet locations (underground conduit).
 
  #3  
Old 07-12-06, 12:20 AM
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Thanks for your help. Is it ok to run pvc inside walls? Is that my best choice, or do I need to get something else?

MrSam
 
  #4  
Old 07-13-06, 03:44 PM
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Yes, you can run PVC in walls. It is fairly cheap and easy to work with, so I recommend PVC. If the conduit is in a location where it could be exposed to damage, you should use schedule 80 PVC instead of the usual schedule 40.
 
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