Code question

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  #1  
Old 07-07-06, 06:18 AM
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Code question

I have two seperate GFI circuits in the kitchen of my cabin, one is to receptacles only. The second one circuit continues on from the last receptacle to a sink light. Is that okay or did I violate code? I also have a dedicated circuit (non GFI) for my refrigerator. Now my question, I ran another circuit (non GIF) in the kitchen putting in two more receptacles, then after the last receptacle I ran it on to my kitchen overhead light. Is that okay? Or should both lights have been on the non GFI circuit? Thanks in advance for anyones help.
 
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Old 07-07-06, 06:31 AM
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Originally Posted by PopPop
I have two seperate GFI circuits in the kitchen of my cabin, one is to receptacles only. The second one circuit continues on from the last receptacle to a sink light.
This does not make sense. How can a separate circuit continue from the last receptacle?

Combining counter top receptacles with any hard wired lights is a code violation.


Originally Posted by PopPop
Now my question, I ran another circuit (non GIF) in the kitchen putting in two more receptacles, then after the last receptacle I ran it on to my kitchen overhead light. Is that okay?
Sounds wrong. No lights on counter top receptacle circuits. And, all counter top receptacles must be GFCI protected.


Dare I ask how this passed inspection?
 
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Old 07-07-06, 06:35 AM
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This does not make sense. How can a separate circuit continue from the last receptacle?

That was worded wrong, sorry. I meant to say on the second circuit after the last receptacle I had wired a light.


Sounds wrong. No lights on counter top receptacle circuits. And, all counter top receptacles must be GFCI protected.


Dare I ask how this passed inspection?

This is a work in progress, I hadn't gotten the final inspection yet.

That was what I needed to know...thanks
 
  #4  
Old 07-10-06, 10:55 AM
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Racraft I borrowed your response above from another post. Now just to see if I am clear on this.

No lights can be on the same circuits as counter top receptacles.

If I took the sink light off the 20a countertop circuit it will only have GFI protected receptacles then will that bring this circuit in code?

The receptacle under the sink cannot be on the same circuit as the counter top receptacles.

Also the second circuit which is a seperate circuit runs behind the sink along the bottom wall and two receptacles on it, if I ran the sink light off that will that bring it to code? If not then could I take the receptacles out, use the receptacles boxes as junction boxes and then run the sink light and the kitchen light off that circuit, would that be code? Thanks
 
  #5  
Old 07-10-06, 11:01 AM
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If a circuit is 20 amp, all the receptacles are GFCI protected, and it serves only kitchen counter top receptacles then it is wired up to current NEC code.

I don't understand what you propose for the other circuit.

You need two (or more) kitchen counter top circuits. These must be 20 amp, must be GFCI protected and cannot serve lights or under sink receptacles.
 
  #6  
Old 07-10-06, 04:59 PM
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Thanks....I think the simplest thing is to just run the two GFI circuits counter top receptacles only, then run a third circuit with no receptacles just for the sink light and kitchen light. thanks again
 
  #7  
Old 07-15-06, 10:14 PM
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Why don't you just replace the breaker that serves the receptacles with a GFI breaker and forget the rest? They are not expensive ($15 or so).
 
  #8  
Old 07-16-06, 05:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Pipsisiwah
Why don't you just replace the breaker that serves the receptacles with a GFI breaker and forget the rest? They are not expensive ($15 or so).
Not correct. GFCI breakers are more expensive than that.
 
  #9  
Old 07-16-06, 09:47 AM
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210.8(A)(6) ( GFCI Required )

(6) Kitchens where the receptacles are installed to serve
the countertop surfaces

NEC 210.52(B)(1) and (2)

(B) Small Appliances.
(1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry,
breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling
unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch
circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and
floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop
outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for
refrigeration equipment.

Exception No. 1: In addition to the required receptacles
specified by 210.52, switched receptacles supplied from a
general-purpose branch circuit as defined in 210.70(A)(1),
Exception No. 1, shall be permitted.

Exception No. 2: The receptacle outlet for refrigeration
equipment shall be permitted to be supplied from an individual
branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.

(2) No Other Outlets. The two or more small-appliance
branch circuits specified in 210.52(B)(1) shall have no
other outlets.

Exception No. 1: A receptacle installed solely for the electrical
supply to and support of an electric clock in any of
the rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1).

Exception No. 2: Receptacles installed to provide power
for supplemental equipment and lighting on gas-fired
ranges, ovens, or counter-mounted cooking units.
 
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