Use motor starter for 1PH 230V AC motor?

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  #1  
Old 07-21-06, 11:29 AM
TSL
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Use motor starter for 1PH 230V AC motor?

Application is a 40s Craftsman belt-drive table saw upon which I have just recently completed a "rebuild" - complete dismantle, stripped, cleaned/derusted, new bearings and snap clips. Bought two and am using best parts from both. One had a Dayton 2HP 115/230V, 21/11.5amp, 3450 rpm, sealed motor with external fan, on an H56 frame. This is the one I intend to mount and use on the saw.

In other news . . . because I have and am teaching my 13 yo son (and some of his friends) in use of my woodworking tools, have set up a large hoffman control panel with pilots, AB key lock switches and estops in the line both on the control panel and on/near the machines themselves. All 120volt machines have had plugs changed to heavy duty twist lock plugs that go into nearby mounted matching outlets so that lock-switched control panel cannot be easily end run. Keys stay with me
- not foolproof if he is determined, but certainly enough to slow him down big time. The estops on/near the various machines are so I can kill the power while he is using it, should a problem arise. Or of course I can stand outta the way near the control panel and kill the power there should it be necessary.

TRUE QUESTION> In doing the research to purchase the correct switches (all AB) I bumped into the motor starter phenomenon and it's occasional use on 1 phase motors to relieve startup and overload strain. Now my Dayton is almost certainly a capacitor start motor. Can one even employ the use of a motor starter for a capacitor start 1 phase motor? Now because I have both an estop and a guarded footswitch on the saw, if I did employ a starter, it would almost need to be mounted on the side of the saw itself because a motor starter, correct me if I'm wrong, should have no power obstructions between itself and
the motor. Is the whole idea of a starter in my application pure
overkill and folly? Or could it make sense to protect the motor with cleaner power and easier starts, creating longevity of the Dayton? Heck maybe the capacitor controls that and the whole thing is ludicrous. Somebody help me, please.

Thanx.
TSL
 
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  #2  
Old 07-21-06, 01:14 PM
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Originally Posted by TSL
Application is a 40s Craftsman belt-drive table saw upon which I have just recently completed a "rebuild" - complete dismantle, stripped, cleaned/derusted, new bearings and snap clips. Bought two and am using best parts from both. One had a Dayton 2HP 115/230V, 21/11.5amp, 3450 rpm, sealed motor with external fan, on an H56 frame. This is the one I intend to mount and use on the saw.

In other news . . . because I have and am teaching my 13 yo son (and some of his friends) in use of my woodworking tools, have set up a large hoffman control panel with pilots, AB key lock switches and estops in the line both on the control panel and on/near the machines themselves. All 120volt machines have had plugs changed to heavy duty twist lock plugs that go into nearby mounted matching outlets so that lock-switched control panel cannot be easily end run. Keys stay with me
- not foolproof if he is determined, but certainly enough to slow him down big time. The estops on/near the various machines are so I can kill the power while he is using it, should a problem arise. Or of course I can stand outta the way near the control panel and kill the power there should it be necessary.

TRUE QUESTION> In doing the research to purchase the correct switches (all AB) I bumped into the motor starter phenomenon and it's occasional use on 1 phase motors to relieve startup and overload strain. Now my Dayton is almost certainly a capacitor start motor. Can one even employ the use of a motor starter for a capacitor start 1 phase motor? Now because I have both an estop and a guarded footswitch on the saw, if I did employ a starter, it would almost need to be mounted on the side of the saw itself because a motor starter, correct me if I'm wrong, should have no power obstructions between itself and
the motor. Is the whole idea of a starter in my application pure
overkill and folly? Or could it make sense to protect the motor with cleaner power and easier starts, creating longevity of the Dayton? Heck maybe the capacitor controls that and the whole thing is ludicrous. Somebody help me, please.

Thanx.
TSL

Advantages when using a motor-starter---

The control conductors which connect the starter to the control devices--- push-buttons,etc.,--- need not be larger than#14

The starter contacts, that switch power to the motor,are "heavy-duty"for maximum durablity aginst "wear & tear"

The starter is equipped with overload devices than will release the starter if the motor is overloaded for an excessive time-period, preventing motor burn-out.

The starter may be placed in any convenient location.What you need as close to the machine as possible is a motor-disconnect.
 
  #3  
Old 07-21-06, 02:55 PM
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Location: Wet side of Washington state.
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A motor starter has no effect upon power quality, neither will it cause the motor to start easier. Its primary mission is to provide overload protection.

Certainly you may use a motor starter on a single-phase motor, it is done all the time.

Saws should NOT have auto reset overload devices on their motors. Manual (push-the-button types are okay) but an auto reset is dangerous because if the overload trips and you do not turn off the manual switch the saw could start when the overload cools.
 
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